All Questions

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0answers
19 views

Who was the first scientist to develop the concept and mathematical formula of string theory?

I was just looking at a YouTube Video interview with Leonard Susskind and did not realize he was the first to discover stings in string theory! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQAcLW6qdQY&...
0
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1answer
26 views

mathematical development

I have two questions regarding the development of mathematics: 1) Is there an example where in mathematics, a collaboration has led to the discovery of another result? I already know something like ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Did Galois make use of the concept of a basis?

I've been reading Galois' First Memoir, where he introduces Galois Theory by giving a sufficient and necessary condition for a polynomial to be solvable by radicals. The proofs are a bit sketchy and ...
0
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1answer
67 views

Level of maths of engineers in the Industrial Revolution

Did engineers like I.K. Brunel and his contemporaries employ calculus in their constructions? Or did they work just with 'rules of the thumb' and useful 'laws' like the square-cube...? What was the ...
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0answers
40 views

Why is the H theorem is called the big eta theorem?

In France, they refer to the H-theorem of Boltzmann (Théorème H) as 'eta'-theorem (théorème 'eta'). The connection obviously comes from the uppercase version of the Greek letter $\eta$, which looks ...
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0answers
32 views

How did Reginald Fessenden realize that spark-gaps could generate waves and the modulation of those waves with voice?

I can somewhat understand how the spark-gap was devised to transmit waves and how the waves were first measured in frequency but what lead to the idea of "modulation" where another electrical signal ...
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0answers
60 views

Big list: things used before they were named [on hold]

I would like to compile a big list of things used before they were named. For example, precalculus was named (according to Merriam-Webster) only in 1964, but of course existed before that. community ...
2
votes
3answers
112 views

Why are permutations ($_nP_r$) called differently in non-English languages (“variations” in German)?

First of all, you should be at least a little familiar with combinatorics to understand that question. Some often used calculator keys in stochastic are the nCr and nPr ones. Edit: I've first asked ...
2
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2answers
103 views

If John Michell was more well known, would he rank above Isaac Newton in the history of science? [closed]

John Michell proposed black holes in the 18th century, hundreds of years before Schwarzschild and Einstein. His ideas were said to to be away head of his time, that he died in obscurity. I assume ...
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0answers
45 views

Questions about the history of proofs of the divergence theorem

The wikipedia article on the divergence theorem states that it was first discovered by Lagrange in 1762, Gauss in 1813, Ostrogradsky in 1826 - who also gave a proof of the general theorem, Green in ...
0
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1answer
36 views

How was the historical definition of the meter used in practice?

The meter was initially defined as $10^{-7}$ times the distance of the north pole to the equator. How exactly was this definition used to fabricate the actual meter sticks from which the standard ...
3
votes
4answers
109 views

How did ancients differenciate between inner and outer planets?

It seems to me that ancients (greeks at least) knew that in their geocentric model Venus and Mercury were closer to them than the sun, and correctly differenciated inner (Mercury and Venus) from outer ...
1
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0answers
32 views

Who came up with a number of the theoretical plates equation?

In chromatography, the signal is shaped like a Gaussian peak, and it is plotted against time vs. instrument's signal. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatography#/media/File:Rt_5_12.png (a) One of ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

How did people measure electric charge at the time of Coulomb?

Around the time that Coulomb gave Coulomb's law, how did people measure electric charge?
6
votes
8answers
186 views

Pop-sci books that were publicly influential but based on weak science

(I hope this is on-topic on this site) I am wondering what are some of the best examples of popular-science books that had large influence in public, but was based on weak science? By "large ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Why do mathematicians call ~ 'twiddle'?

Every one of my lecturers have always called it this, as do I, despite the fact that I know its properly called 'tilde'. Does anyone have any clue where this convention comes from and why it might ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Why was the idea of anti-particles having negative mass abandoned?

In Dirac's 1938 paper on classically radiating electrons, he writes: Secondly we have the idea of the positron... in which positive and negative values for the mass of an electron play symmetrical ...
2
votes
3answers
174 views

How was gravity explained in Ancient Greek and Roman times?

Gravity is of course something that we can all observe. Stuff falls towards the ground. But not everything: some things like steam or smoke defy this force and instead float up. During Ancient Greek ...
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0answers
45 views

Mechanical work formula

What developments led to the definition of Work as dot product of Force and Displacement vectors? I did some searching but couldn't find a satisfying answer. Acc to what I have read the initial ...
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0answers
56 views

History of linear algebra in computer graphics

What is the History of linear algebra in computer graphics? And write its any three objectives
5
votes
1answer
184 views

Did Michel Rolle say that the calculus is “a collection of ingenious fallacies”?

It is probable that this quote was popularized by the writings of Morris Kline, e.g. in Mathematics for Liberal Arts (1967): [Michel Rolle] taught that the calculus was a collection of ingenious ...
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Biographical informations on Igor Ado

Ado's Theorem is a very reelvant result in Lie theory (every finite-dimensional Lie algebra is isomorphic to a matrix Lie algebra). I've been, however, unable to find anything more than very basics ...
3
votes
2answers
133 views

What are historical applications of geometry to measuring distances beyond human reach?

I am searching for books and articles about applications of Geometry, in particular to the problem of computing distances and lengths which are apparently beyond human reach. As an example, consider ...
0
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0answers
54 views

Lomonsov gravity vs liberal-relativistic gravity

Just wonder if there was ever any response to Mikhail Lomonsov's theory that Gravity is pressure differences in the aether. This overcomes self interaction and other problems in liberal gravity.
0
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1answer
89 views

What if we measure a physical constant to higher accuracy? [closed]

So, the SI system of units has the basic philosophy of defining all 7 of the base units in terms of universal constants such as the plank constant, the speed of light, etc. These are all measured, ...
1
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0answers
52 views

Was Lorentz aware of Le Sage theory?

I just wondered if Lorentz was aware of Le Sage theory. Seems like he uses similar math. Is there any direct quote from Lorentz regarding Le Sage gravity?
11
votes
1answer
213 views

Notation for Christoffel symbols

In Christoffel's 1869 paper in which he introduced the Christoffel symbols on the 3rd and 4th pages, they are written as $\left[\substack{ij \\ k}\right]$ and $\{\substack{ij \\ k}\}$. The notation $...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Clairaut's proposed correction (reported as “D'Alembert's, Clairaut's and Euler's corrections”) to the Newtonian inverse-square law of gravity

From A.P. Yushkevich, "Leonhard Euler, his life and work", in "Development of Leonhard Euler's ideas and contemporary science", Nauka, Moscow, 1988, 15--46 (translation from Russian is mine): "One ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Origin of Gauss-Newton method

The Gauss-Newton method can be derived from Newton's method, but I am unable to see how Gauss was linked with this method. It seems unlikely that he himself worked on the method, but I am at a loss.
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Why is Riemann's dissertation (from 1851) considered a turning point in the history of the theory of conformal mappings?

The intention behind my question is to understand what are the kind of general problems of which the ideas of Riemann's dissertation (1851) lie at the heart of it's solution methods. In his ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

First discussion of radial/volume excess in General Relativity

A well-known (but usually only cursorily discussed) feature of General Relativity is the so-called radial (or volume) excess due to the curvature of spacetime in the presence of mass/energy (or more ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Who first proved Fubini's theorem for abstract measure spaces?

Fubini's theorem relates the double integral of a function $f(x,y)$ to an iterated integral with respect to $x$ and $y$. The basic idea of this theorem for Riemann integrals of continuous functions ...
4
votes
3answers
176 views

What are some good references elucidating the discovery/creation of Fourier Series?

I've always grappled with the topic of anything Fourier during my undergrad days. Until recently when revisiting why I learned what I did, I discovered how Fourier's desire to understand the flow of ...
1
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0answers
70 views

How widespread was the belief that the earth is round in Europe until the Renaissance?

Already Greek mathematicians in antiquity b.C. realized that the earth was round, and the idea was operative in Europe ever since. But how widespread was this belief in the centuries until the ...
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0answers
32 views

Modern Views on Pythagoras [duplicate]

I've done a lot of research on Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans and am currently in a state of uncertainty. I do believe Pythagoras existed, but I am unsure if he can be given credit to hardly anything ...
0
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2answers
60 views

What motivated the choice of the word “model” in model theory?

Who chose the term "model" in model theory? What was their reason for choosing the word "model" to mean what it means now in model theory? The current meaning: "[interpretation] I is a model of [...
0
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0answers
45 views

Irrational numbers math in old Roman age [duplicate]

I know that Hippasus proved that $√2$ is irrational number. My question is how were they doing the mathmatical operations like multiplication for rational numbers like 1.41421356237 I can do ...
3
votes
1answer
128 views

Why do we call Chinese monoid “Chinese”? Why not “American”?

Why do we call Chinese monoid "Chinese"? Why not "American"? You can find the definition of Chinese monoid from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_monoid
8
votes
2answers
169 views

What are natural science concepts that were once thought the same, but grew to be distinguished?

The history of physics is full of examples of phenomena that used to be described independently, until additional insight proved they were the same thing. Some famous instances are motion of bullets ...
1
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0answers
59 views

What pythagorean table looked like?

Pythagoras introduced the multiplication table in Southern Italy about 500 BC, do we know how it looked like? Edit I do not mean the so called pytagorean/multiplication/times table but the actual ...
4
votes
2answers
126 views

How did Romans do multiplications?

The Romans hadn't indian numerals, but what 's worse hadn't the decimal system, yet produced amazing works of engineering and architecture. How was that possible? It's troublesome to make simple ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Did Ludwig Boltzmann read Albert Einstein's publication published on Brownian motion one year before Boltzmann passed away?

Apparently there was some negative reception of Boltzmann's idea of an "atom". I assume the mathematics used by Einstein in his publication did not use any of Boltzmann's statistical mathematics ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Why did Euclid define “a unit” instead of “the unit”?

I know Euclid's Definition VII.1 of a unit only from English and German translations: A unit is (that) according to which each existing (thing) is said (to be) one. [translation by Fitzpatrick] ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Explanation of Gauss's late fragments dealing with “the conformal image of the ellipse”

My question refers to some not very well known fragments of Gauss that treat the problem of finding a conformal mapping (angle-preserving mapping) in the complex plane from the interior of the ellipse ...
5
votes
1answer
48 views

What was the old system of using right circular cones to solve problems about circles in the plane?

[I asked this originally at the Math Stack Exchange, and they suggested I also ask about it here.] I heard about this from a college professor but haven't ever been able to find any other mention of ...
4
votes
0answers
109 views

Name of the paper that suffered a famous editor mistake

I have heard about a "famous" mistake made on a physics paper by the editor of a scientific journal but I can't seem to find the paper or even to recall what it was about. Has anyone hear of this and ...
1
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0answers
42 views

Clarification of some pages from Gauss's nachlass dealing with “convergence of developement of midpoint equation”

Yesterday i took my time to look again into Schlesinger's essay on Gauss's contributions to analysis, and i found something new i didn't know about (so it caught my eye) in the last subsection of the ...
3
votes
1answer
167 views

Does any extant Greek text prove that the area of an inscribed regular polygon increases with the number of sides?

Does any extant Greek text prove that the area of a regular polygon inscribed in a fixed circle increases with the number of sides in the polygon? I can't find such a proposition in Euclid, but the ...
1
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0answers
66 views

Were the ancient Greeks aware of the “topology” of (Euclidean) space?

Related to a more mathematically inclined question, I'd like to ask the following question: The ancient Greeks made use of infinite arguments and processes (limits), e.g. in the method of exhaustion ...
2
votes
0answers
75 views

Earliest drawings of the plots of trigonometric functions

[Even though this question may seem as a duplicate of this question about the History of sine function, I'd like to ask it again - with a more specific title and a more specific focus (on specific ...

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