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Mikhail Ostrogradsky and non-Euclidean Geometry

I read in a book of popularization of Mathematics that in 1830 Mikhail Ostrogradsky wrote, about non-Euclidean Geometry, that he did not see why anyone would care about that, since the world is ...
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0answers
21 views

I have fermats had mine poof can you help to publish in jeans I not personally mathematicians d I anurasiri sir LankaD

I have fermats had mine poof can you help to publish in jeans I not personally mathematicians d I anurasiri sir LankaD
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0answers
29 views

Why is Einstein-Hilbert action called Einstein-Hilbert action?

I understand that Einstein was the first one who came up with Einstein's equations, but did Einstein do anything to deserve his share of name in the action Hilbert found? Who first called the action ...
2
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3answers
57 views

Where did the false “equal transit-time” explanation of lift originate from?

It's supposedly a "widely circulated" false claim that wings generate lift because of their asymmetric shape, forcing air above to travel faster so that they meet up on the trailing edge at the same ...
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1answer
63 views

How did Hagoromo Fulltouch chalk gain so much popularity among mathematicians in the West?

I recently read Hagoromo, the 'Rolls Royce of chalk,' continues writing its legacy in South Korea article recently, and was fascinated by the huge amount of attention this specific chalk is getting. ...
3
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1answer
72 views

Does anyone know of any examples of the Magnus effect in a real battle?

I've read a lot about the Magnus effect altering the trajectories of cannonballs and musketballs. Robins noticed it with Musket balls and Magnus with canonballs, but presuably they weren't the first ...
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1answer
78 views

How did Milton Babitt teach math at Princeton and research math, without an undergraduate degree in math?

Even if Babbitt taught merely elementary calculus, don't universities hire someone with at least an undergraduate degree in math to teach it? I quote Schoenblog.com: Babbitt came to teach at ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Origin of the “law of quadratic reciprocity”

Today, "reciprocity" is the standard mathematical word used for quadratic reciprocity and its generalizations. I found that the name dates back to no later than 1832, when a paper of Dirichlet (...
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1answer
62 views

Reference for history of physics with description of mathematical models

I am interested in some reference text, for example, textbook that would describe going from old times (say, Greece) till modern times: 1) definitions of units and measurements 2) describing ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Did Isaac Barrow also discover the other thing about the inverse relation between area and tangent?

Barrow surely discovered that the tangent to the area curve of a function at a point equals the value of the function at that point. Also, I’ve seen geometric proofs of this. But did he also discover ...
3
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0answers
43 views

Asymptotically Periodic Potentials

Who came up with the idea of solving elliptic equations with periodic potentials and from there solving elliptic equations with asymptotically periodic potentials? I heard it was Pierre Louis Lions, ...
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2answers
133 views

Did anyone with formal medical education become a known theoretical physicist?

Was there someone in history who became a theoretical physicist after getting a medical education and later taking interest in physics? I am a medical student studying graduate mathematics, and ...
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0answers
55 views

How did Hardy and Littlewood formulate the k-tuple conjecture?

Let $\mathcal{H}_k = (h_1,h_2,\cdots,h_k)$ be an admissible k-tuple. The k-tuple conjecture predicts that the number of primes $(b+h_1,b+h_2,\cdots,b+h_k)\in \mathbb{P}^k$ with $b+h_k \leq x$ is: $$\...
7
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1answer
127 views

What is Poincare's “Fourth Geometry”?

In Science and Hypothesis, Poincare cryptically describes a "Fourth Geometry." Can anyone clarify what he is talking about? Is there a standard name for this geometry? The Fourth Geometry.—Among ...
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27 views

Did Wheeler accept Carter's anthropic principle-based multiverse?

Physicist John Wheeler wrote an article called "Genesis and Observership" where he said near the end: "We have reviewed the evidence out of the big bang tat the universe did come into being and the ...
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0answers
82 views

Two questions about Gauss's contributions to capillarity and the calculus of variations

In the last page of the abstract of Gauss's paper on capillarity "Principia generalia theoriae figurae fluidorum in statu aequilibrii" (1829), the author (who is he?) mentions (Gauss's werke, volume V,...
6
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1answer
130 views

What is the origin of the Chinese Stick Multiplication method?

A while back I came across an interesting method to do multiplication. I don't know what it's called and am interested in when (and who) developed this method. I don't know if it's a mathematical ...
5
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1answer
73 views

Did the principles of celestial mechanics affect the development of electromagnetism?

Much of the early theoretical work in electricity and magnetism appears to have been the result of applying celestial mechanical principles to electrostatics. Examples include Cavendish's inverse-...
5
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2answers
154 views

Reference Request: Did Descartes leave solving the quintic as an exercise to his readers?

In this document by Jim Brown it is claimed (on Section 3, pg 5) that: [Descartes] believed that all polynomials of degree $>4$ could be solved with the same methods as had been applied to the ...
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0answers
60 views

How did Bishop Francis Godwin Know About Mass and Gravity Pre-Newton?

In the answer to this question, a user provided a quote from the 1638 novel The Man in the Moone by Bishop Francis Godwin: The manner of our Travel to the Palace of Pylonas was more strange and ...
2
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0answers
61 views

Where did the notation for dimensions of a quantity come from?

The current SI Brochure defines the dimension of a certain physical quantity as something separate from its units, and treated in detail in its §2.3.3: This is, by now, pretty bread-and-butter ...
2
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0answers
68 views

What did people mean by the term Force in earlier times?

Initially I used to believe that before Newton gave his Laws of Motion, people thought that Force was something that caused motion. It was Newton who first said that Force is something that causes ...
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0answers
27 views

Origin of mechanical work before work energy theorem

I am interested to know when and why was the concept of mechanical work (W=F.s) introduced? What was the motivation behind it/ why was it considered meaningful before the work energy theorem? ...
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2answers
113 views

Dimension of the candela unit: What does J stand for?

The J symbol can represent the unit of energy but it's also the symbol for the dimension of the candela (or luminous intensity). For the energy unit, it clearly comes from the family name of the ...
3
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60 views

I want to know the source of why Archimedes' broken chord theorem is Archimedes good

I found "The Arabian scholar Abu'l Raihan al'biruni" has attributed to Archimedes the theorem of the broken chord in web. But I couldn't find a book or papers that this Arabian scholar wrote.
3
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1answer
111 views

Where in Gauss's nachlass apears his sketch of a geometric proof for the biquadratic reciprocity law?

According to p.200-202 of the book "Reciprocity Laws: From Euler to Eisenstein" by Franz Lemmermeyer, there are two proofs for the biquadratic reciprocity law in Gauss's nachlass: one is a cyclotomic ...
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0answers
65 views

Textbooks used by Oliver Heaviside

Oliver Heaviside achieved a very high level in mathematics and physics by self-study, starting from a modest school-level math, and working alone in his room, without a tutor. Is it known what ...
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1answer
90 views

Conventional orientation of axes in scientific plots

In an answer to a programming question, I included the following: The default behavior of [library function in question that displays an image] is to put the origin of the coordinate system in the ...
2
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0answers
55 views

Did Wheeler ever propose the existence of a multiverse containing parallel simultaneous universes?

It is known that the physicist John Archibald Wheeler proposed the existence of a multiverse in the form of a set of cycles of Big Bangs and Big Crunches (Cyclic/Oscillatory Multiverse Model). But I ...
2
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0answers
52 views

On Trigonometric Methods Available to Aristarchus

Approximately 2300 years ago, Aristarchus proposed a method for determining the relative distances of the sun and the moon in relation to the earth. Specifically, he asserted that when the moon is in ...
6
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1answer
136 views

Foucault pendulum historical question

I was wondering if anyone knows if Foucault actually gave a mathematical description of his observations related to the apparent motion of the pendulum. And if he didn't prove it, who described the ...
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1answer
70 views

Did physicist David Bohm ever propose the existence of a multiverse?

Did physicist David Bohm ever propose the existence of any kind of multiverse?
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167 views

How was this equation for pi derived by Ramanujan?

Have we figured out how this series was derived by Ramanjuan? $$\frac{1}{\pi}=\frac{\sqrt{8}}{9801}\sum_{n=0}^{\infty}\frac{(4n)!}{(n!)^4}\frac{26390n+1103}{396^{4n}}$$
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24 views

Non-dte differential element

I have come to talk about the notation $\delta W$ or d with a bar W for the work in Thermodynamics. Few years ago, one of my teachers told me about the d with a bar notation. Few years later, I ...
4
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57 views

Is there a biography of Robert Risch?

The Risch algorithm for computing symbolic integrals was developed by Robert Risch in the 1968-70 time frame. Based on the German Wikipedia article, I know that Risch was awarded a Ph.D. by U.C. ...
2
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1answer
67 views

Why was Indicial equations named so?

In ODE, in Frobenius method, there's an equation called "Indicial Equation." Is there any particular contextual/historical reason that it is named so?
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0answers
108 views

Did it take 378 pages to prove 1+1=2?

Is it it true that Russel and Whitehead in their Principia Mathematica took 378 pages to prove 1+1=2? Does that indicate any flaw in the formal proof and the disregard for empirical evidence?
6
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1answer
91 views

Who invented the gradient descent algorithm?

In connection to the question "Who invented the gradient?", I want to know who invented the gradient descent algorithm?
2
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1answer
92 views

What is the idea behind the naming of the term “displacement current” in electromagnetism?

I'd like to get an explanation why Maxwell chose the name "displacement current" for the term $\mu_0\epsilon_0\frac{\partial E}{\partial t}$ he added to Ampere's law (Maxwell's correction). I'm ...
7
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2answers
565 views

On the history of Haar measure

Haar measure is a well-known concept in measure theory. Many books are perfectly dedicated to present its existence and uniqueness such as measure theory for D. Cohn. I am looking for a good ...
3
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1answer
94 views

When/Why did Septagon change to Heptagon?

I graduated high school in 1980, and as a second career, am helping HS students with their math. I just finished my 6th year of this, and have just one question about the change noted in the title. ...
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0answers
82 views

Is there any general difference between British, French and German mathematicians?

I am recently learning about teaching the history of mathematics. Gradually, impressions about mathematicians in different countries develops in my mind. I just want to ask, whether it is helpful to ...
0
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3answers
78 views

Does Heliocentrism predate Copernicus?

I have seen this mentioned on the interwebs a few times. people have mentioned that some Greek thinkers and Islamic astronomers came up with heliocentrism before Copernicus and that Copernicus copied ...
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0answers
38 views

How did Gibbs discover Gibbs entropy?

I have read and I think that I agree with the idea that if we have to choose probability distribution for an unknown system then it is a good idea to choose a distribution that has the least bias. I ...
2
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0answers
24 views

Difference between Perrin's and J. J. Thomson's experiment

In J. J. Thomson's paper (Phil. Mag. S. 5. Vol. 44. No. 269. Oct. 1897) concerned with cathode rays, Thomson writes, that the experiment by Perrin that supposedly proves that cathode rays are made of ...
2
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1answer
96 views

What was this experiment tainted by the observer effect?

I once heard a cautionary tale about the dangers of the observer-expectancy effect. It was at least presented as a true example from the history of science, but I'm having trouble identifying the ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Was there a more intuitive early proof of the generalized mean value theorem?

I am interested in the early proofs of the theorem. It is often called Cauchy mean value theorem, so perhaps Cauchy proved it first. In all the proofs that I have seen we construct a contrived ...
6
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1answer
546 views

How did J. J. Thomson establish the particle nature of the electron?

In its article about how the electron was discovered, Wikipedia says that Thomson and his students performed experiments which suggested that cathode rays were negatively charged "particles". But even ...
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0answers
29 views

How did J. J. Thomson establish particle nature of electron?

I've read about how the electron was discovered on Wikipedia and they have said that Thomson and his students performed experiments which suggested that cathode rays were negatively charged "particles"...
6
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1answer
101 views

Source for this story about EInstein learning algebra from his uncle

I have occasionally run into the following story (or a variation of it) about Albert Einstein: Young Albert did not like algebra, and his uncle is supposed to have aroused his curiosity by ...

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