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A paper published in 1975 references The Art of Computer Programming (then published in 1969), so it's probably the first edition. I can't even find this edition for sale anywhere. Would you be so kind to photograph (or something) pages 7, 8 and 25?

Even though I'm able to more or less match what the possible content was (by looking at the newer edition), I'm interested in knowing precisely what was written on these pages because I'm interested in the historical development of some ideas, so I'm trying to infer what influenced the researcher.

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    $\begingroup$ We're not going to violate copyright for you, but you may get some traction from a Google Books search. $\endgroup$ – Spencer Feb 24 at 23:25
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    $\begingroup$ You should check the US code chapter 17, paragraph 107. It's no violation of copyright to photograph a few pages for educational purposes. $\endgroup$ – user724963 Feb 25 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ Is there a difference between the editions? Why a newer is not okay? $\endgroup$ – peterh - Reinstate Monica Feb 25 at 22:27
  • $\begingroup$ A fair question. I wish to read the same exact pages someone else has read. The author references the pages, not the content, so either I read the same exact pages or I won't know exactly what he was seeing. It's about history. I'm trying to see what an author has seen, so if I can look at the same thing at which he looked, then I'm at a better position then if I try to infer what he was seeing. I had not found a first edition until @user25457 pointed out those websites. I have a first edition coming my way now. $\endgroup$ – user724963 Feb 25 at 23:39
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If you search for the book here, you will be able to find the libraries near you that have this edition. You may be able to arrange an interlibrary loan if it is too far to travel.

I also checked a couple of used book search engines (this and this) and found that there are a number of copies of the 1969 edition for sale.

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I'm not precisely sure, but are these the pages you're looking for? If not, can you describe the content rather than page numbers?
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  • $\begingroup$ Interesting. These are not the right pages. Have a look at the first paragraph of this paper. "Our method was suggested by [3], pp. 7--8, 25." And [3] is Knuth's volume 2 from 1969. I bought the edition of 1969, but haven't received it yet. I will make sure to update it here when I get it. Thank you so much for these pages --- the quality is horrible, though. $\endgroup$ – user724963 Mar 7 at 22:35

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