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Who were the mathematicians who hated teaching in class or disliked teaching?

From this Article:

Gauss hated teaching, and believed some students robbed him of his time.

From this Article:

Perelman hated teaching in class. He decided to work alone same like Isaac Newton so he left a U.S. university and went to his native country Russia, where he was paid less than a hundred dollars per month.

Are there any others?

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    $\begingroup$ I do not think Perelman ever taught a class. $\endgroup$ – Moishe Kohan Jan 18 at 21:55
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One example is Sidney Coleman, though he was a theoretical physicist and not a mathematician. In an interview, he said:

I hate [teaching]. You do it as part of the job. Well, that's of course false ... or maybe more true than false when I say I hate it. ... But I certainly would be just as happy if I had no graduate students. ... Occasionally there is a graduate student who is a joy to collaborate with. Both David Politzer and Erick Weinberg were of this kind, but they were essentially almost mature physicists. They were very bright by the time they came to me. In general, working with a graduate student is like teaching a course. It's tedious, unpleasant work. A pain in the neck. You do it because you're paid to do it. If I weren't paid to do it I certainly would never do it.2

Interview of Sidney Coleman by Katherine Sopka on 1977 January 18, Niels Bohr Library & Archives, American Institute of Physics, College Park, MD USA, www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories/31234

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    $\begingroup$ It's worth adding to this that Coleman was a famously good lecturer. $\endgroup$ – Dan Fox Jan 27 at 12:01
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Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) taught at school for one term and while he did not hate it, he found it very challenging. Here are some diary entries:

26 February 1856

The class again noisy and inattentive; it is very disheartening, and I almost think I had better give up teaching there for the present.

29 February 1856

[I] left word at the school that I shall not be able to come again for the present. I doubt if I shall try again next term, the good done does not seem worth the time and trouble.

Taken from here: https://mathshistory.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Dodgson_teaching/

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