-1
$\begingroup$

Given that Euclid's work is titled "The Elements", it is safe to imply that it is a compendium of elementary results of Ancient Greek Geometry. Other works, such as those of Apollonius, Archimedes and others of Euclid's can be considered the 'achievements' of the Ancient Greek Geometry.

Is there any knowledge of extant, or evidence of, other ancient Greek books for introducing mathematics?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Proclus, based on Eudemus's historical survey, names five Elements written before Euclid's, by Hippocrates of Chios, Leon, Eudoxus of Cnidus, Theudius of Magnesia and Hermotimus of Colophon. None are extant. Euclid incorporated the material from those, added more, and organized it in an exemplary manner. $\endgroup$
    – Conifold
    May 23, 2021 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

0
$\begingroup$

Quoting from A History of Mathematics (3rd edition), by Victor J. Katz:

Although there were earlier versions of Elements before that of Euclid, his is the only one to survive, perhaps because it was the first one written after both the foundations of proportion theory and the theory of irrationals had been developed and the careful distinctions always to be made between number and magnitude had been proponded by Aristotle. It was therefore both “complete” and well organized. Since the mathematical community as a whole was of limited size, once Euclid's work was recognized for its general excellence, there was no reason to keep another inferior work in circulation.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Diophantus wrote one of the first number theory books "Arithmetica".

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Diophantus (c. 250 AD) lived approximately over five centuries after Euclid (c. 300 BC). $\endgroup$
    – Conifold
    May 23, 2021 at 22:19

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.