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Are there historians of science that are systematically recording current activity in research mathematics ?

For example, a decade ago there was a lot of stuff through blogs and Mathoverflow, nowadays there at least sociological interactions on Twitter. All this will probably be easy to browse in the future thanks to the Wayback Machine.

but what about private emails of researchers with colleagues and with journals, are there efforts to archive this very valuable material?

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    $\begingroup$ I suspect amount of stuff in blog and other non-published venues is too great for people to browse through sufficiently to find all things of interest and to establish nontrivial historical trends. However, I also suspect this can be done using various archives by trans-human intelligences (AI, enhanced humans, etc.) that undoubtedly will begin replacing us in 100 to 150 years. The real question is whether these entities consider it worth while, or the issues so trivial from their view that it would be like us seeking to know how many characters appear in each book published in the 1800s. $\endgroup$ Jul 1 at 16:38
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but what about private emails of researchers with colleagues and with journals, are there efforts to archive this very valuable material?

Private emails are supposed to be private and any efforts to archive them would be illegal.

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  • $\begingroup$ Obviously I meant a legally sound procedure whereby all members of an email exchange agree for it to be made publicly available. $\endgroup$
    – user14874
    Jul 1 at 11:38
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with this answer. If I want to make some of my private e-mails public, then I post them. Otherwise they are private. It is the author who decides what of his/her correspondence should be made public. $\endgroup$ Jul 1 at 14:49
  • $\begingroup$ @user14874: Please point out where in your question a legally sound procedure is described. $\endgroup$
    – Mark Sapir
    Jul 1 at 14:54

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