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Wikipedia says he died of natural causes. I recall going through a N. Wildberger lecture on the history of mathematics and got a different account. He was stabbed by a Roman soldier while Rome was busy conquering Greece. There was a model of the solar system in his room. Etc...What is the fact here?

Edit: Yeah I did confuse Archimedes with Aristotle. My bad.

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    $\begingroup$ Someone is confusing Archimedes and Aristotle. $\endgroup$ Sep 2 '21 at 18:19
  • $\begingroup$ Even the details of the death of Archimedes story are likely made up, no one who was there left an account. Aristotle's death is typically attributed to a stomach illness that he had for a long time. Diogenes mentions aconite poisoning, but from a source who could not even get the dates right. $\endgroup$
    – Conifold
    Sep 2 '21 at 20:57
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    $\begingroup$ Macedonian wars (resulting in conquest of Greece, and much of the Eastern mideterranian by Rome) started over 100 years after death of Aristotle. I suggest, you reread your source. $\endgroup$ Sep 2 '21 at 21:16
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    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because it is based on a simple mistake a minute of prior research would have avoided. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 '21 at 5:02
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There were no Roman soldiers in Greek lands when Aristotle died. Probably he died of natural causes, though I've heard of a speculation that he was murdered on the order of Alexander the great. It is true that at some point Alexandre went crazy and started killing his friends, for example Callisthenes, a great nephew of Aristotle. But I think this speculation about ordering to kill Aristotle is unjustified.

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    $\begingroup$ Alexander was dead for a year when Aristotle died, he was not giving orders from his grave. What is the point of recirculating an outlandish anecdote without even referencing a source? $\endgroup$
    – Conifold
    Sep 2 '21 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ @Conifold: Alexander died in Babylon, or near it. And Aristotle dies in Euboea. I recall that at that time there was no Internet, phones, or even airplanes. An assassin or a messenger had to travel, and this could take some time. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 '21 at 1:04
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexandreEremenko Babylon wasn't close, but it wasn't that far. By the time Aristotle died, people in Greece (and everywhere it was relevant) were well aware of Alexander's death, which is in fact the reason why Aristotle had to leave Athens. $\endgroup$
    – Gae. S.
    Sep 3 '21 at 5:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Alexandde Eremenko In the Englaish language the parants of parents are grand parents and their parents are great grandparents. So the siblings of grandparents should logically be grand uncles and aunts, and the siblings of great grandparents should be great grand uncles and aunts. And the same should go in the other directin for the descendants of Siblings. A lot of English speakers ignore logical and use great uncle or great nephew when they should say granduncle or grandnephew, but but I see no reason why anyone should. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 '21 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ @M. A. Golding: I was following Wikipedia which calls Callisthenes "Aristoteles great uncle". $\endgroup$ Sep 3 '21 at 20:49

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