1
$\begingroup$

The Chemistry SE question What dodecahedral molecule is Linus Pauling likely holding in this photograph? Does it have 40 carbon atoms? begins:

The video Quasicrystals ; Prof. Daniel Shechtman ; Nobel Prize in Chemistry focuses on Professor Dan Shechtman but happens to include some photos of Linus Pauling who never believed in quasicrystals. From the video:

The leader of that group was Professor Linus Pauling, a two-time Nobel laureate. He was a very important figure and an idol of the American Chemical Society, and to his last day, he was standing on stages and published papers saying that "Daniel Shechtman is talking nonsense."

During this part of the video there is shown a photo of Linus Pauling holding some ball and stick molecular models. These appear to be dodecahedral arrangements (12 pentagons, 20 vertices) of possibly carbon atoms.

From each atom of the dodecahedron another atom protrudes.

The question was closed as "opinion-based" because it was decided that a fact-based answer to what Pauling was holding up in the 1950's photograph couldn't be identified with sufficient certainty for a Chemistry SE answer.

There was speculation there that this was in 1954 "taken on occasion of (Pauling's) 1954 NP (Nobel Prize) award".

As it is now too late to migrate but I can't get this image nor this structure out of my craw as evidenced by two new Chemistry SE questions:

I'd like to now ask:

Question: What molecule's models might Linus Pauling be holding up in this photo? Perhaps something akin to pentagonal dodecahedrane, or could they be viruses?*

Clearly I'm grasping at straws, but there might be a recording or transcript of some speech related to Pauling's 1954 Nobel Prize award.

screenshot from the video "Quasicrystals ; Prof. Daniel Shechtman ; Nobel Prize in Chemistry" https://youtu.be/V2GqU6fdjeQ?t=420

$\endgroup$
2

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.