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Back in 1968, James M. Bardeen (son of John Bardeen) gave a talk at the GR5 (5th international conference on gravitation and the theory of relativity), in which he presented a slight modification of the Schwarzschild metric, probably the first example of a regular spacetime metric.

This work is quite often cited and some basic, technical info can be traced all over the internet, e.g.

J.M. Bardeen: Non-singular general-relativistic gravitational collapse, Proceedings of the International Conference GR5, Tbilisi, U.S.S.R. (1968), p. 174

https://scholar.google.com/scholar_lookup?title=Proceedings%20of%20the%20International%20Conference%20GR5&publication_year=1968&author=J.M.%20Bardeen

https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85050674326&origin=inward&txGid=b29b1e1ac4ac0c72d4c00bc10b810ef1&featureToggles=FEATURE_NEW_DOC_DETAILS_EXPORT:1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonsingular_black_hole_models

Unfortunately, according to the official conference page,

http://www.isgrg.org/pastconfs.php

no official proceedings were printed.

Is there any unofficial, handwritten or printed, trace of the Bardeen's talk?

Update (April 12th, 2022): I have sent a mail to Prof. Bardeen one week ago, asking for any information about this talk/paper, but unfortunately I haven't got any reply so far.

Update (April 22nd, 2022): I still haven't received any reply from Prof. Bardeen, but I've finally managed to locate physical copies of the GR5 Proceedings: one in The Library of Congress,

https://catalog.loc.gov/vwebv/holdingsInfo?searchId=9651&recCount=25&recPointer=0&bibId=1346182

and another one at the University of Vienna,

https://usearch.univie.ac.at/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=UWI_alma21243303620003332&context=L&vid=UWI&lang=en_US&search_scope=UWI_UBBestand&adaptor=Local%20Search%20Engine&tab=default_tab&query=any,contains,International%20Conference%20on%20Gravitation%20and%20the%20Theory%20of%20Relativity&mode=basic

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