1
$\begingroup$

I'm looking for any bio/info/obit on Alan Earnshaw, who was a co-author of Norman Greenwood (who has a wiki page and an online obit).

FYI, I tried several different Google searches, but the best I could find was this (which still doesn't give a bio).

https://www.webofstories.com/play/norman.greenwood/247;jsessionid=174643C48058427665476156573239C5

[Asked on Chem SE and a moderator recommended to try here.]

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Actually a user (not a moderator) recommended asking here, but forgot to tell you about migration which would preserve the discussion in comments. Now we have the same question cross-posted on two sites (not your fault!) which is discouraged. Unless you are in a hurry, what I would recommend is that you delete this copy and wait for the Chemistry SE moderators to migrate the original question here. In the mean time, add (there) what they co-authored? $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Jan 30, 2023 at 21:59
  • $\begingroup$ According to the amazon preview of Earnshaw's 1968 text Introduction to Magnetochemistry, he was a professor of Inorganic and Structural Chemistry at the University of Leeds. He may also have been written extensively on the history of railways in the UK. $\endgroup$
    – nwr
    Jan 30, 2023 at 22:04
  • $\begingroup$ I'm fine if either gets deleted, crossposted, migrated by users, moderatoors. Won't touch it for now. Since, I feel like I'm messing things up. $\endgroup$
    – guest
    Jan 30, 2023 at 22:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks nwr (and for the people at ChemSE, also.) $\endgroup$
    – guest
    Jan 30, 2023 at 22:12

3 Answers 3

5
$\begingroup$

Piecing together multiple Google snippets from The University of Leeds Review, Vol. 38, 1995, p. 249:

Alan Earnshaw retired from the School of Chemistry in September 1995. After graduating from Sheffield in 1955 , he obtained the degree of PhD at London in 1958, and then served as a lecturer at Battersea College of Technology until his arrival in Leeds as a lecturer in the Department of Inorganic and Structural Chemistry at a salary on the scale £1,000 ...

The German Wikipedia provides some additional details: Earnshaw received a bachelor degree at Sheffield, and his employment at the University of Leeds commenced in 1966. Earnshaw is the author of three books:

Alan Earnshaw, Introduction to Magnetochemistry. London: Academic Press 1968. 115 pp.
A. Earnshaw and T.J. Harrington, The Chemistry of the Transition Elements. Oxford: Oxford University Press 1973. 101 pp.
N.N. Greenwood and A. Earnshaw, Chemistry of the Elements. Oxford: Pergamon Press 1984. 1542 pp.

While I was able to find UK obituaries for people with the name Alan Earnshaw, none of them appear to be for the professor of chemistry. Based on the date of retirement and the year he received his bachelor degree, Earnshaw was likely born around 1930. Publicly available UK birth records show several potential candidates, but without a known place of birth it is impossible to identify any of those as the relevant one.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ njuffa, good job! $\endgroup$
    – guest
    Jan 30, 2023 at 22:49
0
$\begingroup$

Hello I am tracing my family tree and so far I can tell you this is his obituary

Alan EARNSHAW March 10, 2009 Suddenly at his home, Alan of Drawbriggs Court, Appleby, formerly of Meltham, Huddersfield. Loving husband of Larraine, father to Sarah, Bryony, Louise and Peter and devoted Grandfather. Funeral service and cremation to take place at Carlisle Crematorium on Friday, March 20 at 12.40 p.m. Family flowers only are requested donations if desired to The Great North Air Ambulance c/o Glyn Jones Funeral Director, 12 Battlebarrow, Appleby-in-Westmorland, CA16 6XS.

If anyone can tell me anything that would be great

$\endgroup$
6
  • $\begingroup$ According to the German Wikipedia to which njuffa linked the chemist which this question is about died in 1995 so cannot be your relative if he dies in 2009. $\endgroup$
    – mdewey
    Oct 9, 2023 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ @mdewey : 'No, 'Ruhestand' in 1995 means retirement, the German wikipedia article says nothing about death. But all the same, the 2009 obituary quoted by Jennifer Northope appears to contain nothing that connects its subject with the Earnshaw who is the subject of the question -- although such an identification remains possible if there is evidence (elsewhere) supporting it. $\endgroup$
    – terry-s
    Oct 9, 2023 at 16:26
  • $\begingroup$ @terry-s whoops. I assumed Ruhe meant his eternal rest not his retirement. Thanks for spotting it. $\endgroup$
    – mdewey
    Oct 9, 2023 at 16:31
  • $\begingroup$ Possibly related: In the foreword to Michael Berry, Huddersfield Trolleys and Buses, Amberley Publishing 2018, the author writes: "I was born in Huddersfield in the mid-1950s [...] Although a former qualified motor engineer, and a former member of the Mersey & Calder Bus Preservation Group, for a time I was employed at Trans-Pennine Publishing at Appleby (a business set up by my late brother-in-law, Professor Alan Earnshaw) ..." $\endgroup$
    – njuffa
    Oct 9, 2023 at 21:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Jennifer Northorpe Is there any information that allows us to conclusively tie this obituary to the professor of chemistry at Leeds? If so, please edit your answer to include that information. UK public birth records show that the birth of an Alan Earnshaw was recorded in June 1932 in the district of Leeds-North, which is in West Yorkshire, as is Huddersfield. So that may be the same person. $\endgroup$
    – njuffa
    Oct 9, 2023 at 21:41
0
$\begingroup$

Alan Earnshaw, author of many railway books, is NOT the same man as Alan Earnshaw, co-author of Chemistry of Elements. Alan Earnshaw who wrote railway books was born on 8 Aug 1952 and died 10 Mar 2009. He was a director of “Trans-Pennine Publishing Limited” and “Nostalgia Road Publications Limited”. His date of birth is in the company information at https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/03240045 and https://find-and-update.company-information.service.gov.uk/company/04772951

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.