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Let's get this out of the way- I am aware that this is nonsense today. However, historically it would have been considered science, so I'm asking here rather than in the History SE.

Classically, foods were associated with the four humors. But while I will hear people occasionally say things like "apples were phlegmatic," I have no idea where they came by this information. Apparently applesauce and pork were combined with this in mind, and most classical recipes had these balances in mind while being made.

So I would like recommendations for good sources/resources to find the humor associations of different foodstuffs. I like experimenting in my kitchen and I thought it would be a fun theme to try, what can I say?

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    $\begingroup$ Since you are asking about (real or purported) properties of foodstuffs, consider the site cooking.stackexchange.com $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 16:37
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    $\begingroup$ It's tricky. It could be cooking, history of cooking, medicine, history of medicine, and they did consider it a science, so history of science seemed fair. I don't want to go posting on all of them all at once because I fear that would be obnoxious but I figure to give each site a few days. $\endgroup$
    – Broklynite
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 20:06
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    $\begingroup$ Here is something I found on the topic: shakespeareandbeyond.folger.edu/2015/12/04/… $\endgroup$
    – Gordon
    Commented Nov 28, 2017 at 21:20

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For those curious about the origins and legacy of theory of humors, the Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humorism offers a good description, even mentioning some food and wine associations. But it does not say much about how and why specific foodstuffs were associated with certain humors. The correspondence was apparently not always obvious: according to the above article, ``when the chili pepper was first introduced to Europe in the sixteenth century, dieticians disputed whether it was hot or cold."

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Turns out the answer seems to be the Roman doctor-philosopher Galen, who wrote extensively on food, diet, and the humors. I found an excellent translation of his work on this specific topic on Amazon here: Galen on Food and Diet https://www.amazon.com/dp/0415232333/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_RhWwBbF900F84

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