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I have lost the reference to a story of someone (I believe it was Emil Artin) who found a strategy for understanding Emmy Noether's rapid delivery of new ideas during walks. It was to walk fast enough and long enough that Noether would get winded, and her delivery would slow down a bit.

Can anyone direct me to a source?

For what it is worth, Noether's Bryn Mawr student Ruth McKee tells us at age 52 Noether could climb between the rails of a rail fence without slowing her discussion. (in Srinivasan and Sally eds. Emmy Noether in Bryn Mawr Springer 1983, p. 144.) But still, I guess enough walking could slow her down a bit.

Since I have published several articles on Noether it is not feasible for me to list here all the sources I have looked at for this. So please let me know if you know a source but do not suggest sources that you just think might have it.

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I got it. The key was to search Natascha Artin. It is Emil Artin's strategy and it is on page 34 of the other premier source on Noether (along with Auguste Dick's book) C. Kimberling, "Emmy Noether," in James W. Brewer and Martha K. Smith, editors, Emmy Noether, A Tribute to Her Life and Work, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1981, Chapter 1, pages 1-61.

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You can try with :

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