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Out of curiosity, I was searching for an English translation of the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, and I found out that there is indeed one. It was translated in English in 1965 by a certain Arthur A. Clarke. Initially, I was amazed since I thought he was the same science fiction author who wrote the Sentinel, the short story that inspired 2001: A Space Odyssey, but then I noticed that the writer is called Arthur C. Clarke, and I could not find a reference on his Wikipedia page that he did this translation. Then I discovered that C. Clarke did graduate in maths and physics, so my doubt remains. Are the two Clarks the same person? If not, could someone give me some information (field of research, university, etc.) about A. Clarke?

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MathSciNet has Arthur Albert Clarke, Ph.D. 1964 at Yeshiva University

I think that rules out the Sci Fi writer Arthur Charles Clarke

Arthur A. Clarke's translation of Disquisitiones arithmeticae was published in 1966. A revision by William C. Waterhouse, Cornelius Greither and A. W. Grootendorst was published in 1986

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  • $\begingroup$ The translator was Arthur A. Clarke, S.J., the chairman of the mathematics department at Fordham University. He died 2 August 2009, according to the NYT notice on 4 August 2009. archive.nytimes.com/query.nytimes.com/gst/… $\endgroup$ Jun 7 '20 at 18:05
  • $\begingroup$ Further: His university's obit news.fordham.edu/university-news/… says he was born 4 June 1917, died 2 August 2009. Math Genealogy misspells his name, and agrees with UMI that his dissertation was "Algebraic solutions of Waring's conjecture". $\endgroup$ Jun 7 '20 at 20:43

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