Yukawa received a Nobel Prize in 1949 for predicting the pi meson but while in Japan he published his theory which explained the interaction between protons and neutrons in 1935. What work did he do during the war years?

I assume his work was not needed by the United States to complete the A-Bomb but did Japan keep it secret since he worked in Japan ?

If it was published I am wondering what the U.S. reaction was considering the U.S. had banned any mention of atomic physics in any form be stripped from any publications in the United States and this also included the press as well as scientists in the U.S.

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    Kyoto University Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics on Dec. 21, 2017 released the journals kept by Yukawa during the second world war. The Japanese site Mainichi provides some interesting, non-technical details. – Nick R Sep 11 at 4:57
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    According to the Wikipedia page on Japan's nuclear programme the Japanese army and navy each has separate programmes: Ni-Go was the army research programme, while F-Go was the navy research programme. Yukawa worked on F-Go under Arakatsu. Perhaps the two programmes were collectively referred to a "F Research". Also, the wiki article states that F-Go started in 1943 following feasibility studies by the Japanese navy undertaken between July'42 and Mar'43. – Nick R Sep 11 at 17:03
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    ... the wiki article also mentions cooperation with the German nuclear programme. – Nick R Sep 11 at 17:05
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    The article Japanese Atomic Bomb Project notes that the theory behind fission was published and widely available before the war. It describes the Japanese efforts as "small and ultimately fruitless". The article states : "Historians generally cite a report from October 1940, penned by Tatsusaburo Suzuki, as the beginning of the Japanese atomic bomb research effort.". The article includes more technical details of the Japanese programmes. .... – Nick R Sep 13 at 0:32
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    ... Regarding the publication of details, the wikipedia article on the Manhattan Project states: "The discovery of nuclear fission by German chemists Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in 1938, and its theoretical explanation by Lise Meitner and Otto Frisch, made the development of an atomic bomb a theoretical possibility." – Nick R Sep 13 at 0:34

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