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This constant is assignable to charged leptons $(e, \mu, \tau)$ representing the fraction of their individual magneton $\hat{m}= e \cdot \hbar/ 2 m$ to their Compton-wavelength $\lambda_{C} = h / m c$: \begin{eqnarray*} \frac{\hat{m}}{\lambda_{C}} = e \cdot c / 4 \pi [\frac{A}{m} \cdot m^{2}] \end{eqnarray*}
Its dimensionality indicates that it determines a natural constant of magnetic flux: $4,8 \times 10^{-18} $ [Wb], however only a fraction $4 \alpha$ of the magnetic flux-quantum $\Phi_{0} = h/ 2e$. The constant may thus define magnetic flux in a leptons dipole-field.

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    $\begingroup$ This does not seem to be a question about history, you should ask on Physics SE. $\endgroup$ – Conifold Mar 20 at 22:29
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    $\begingroup$ As a physicist, I can confidently state that it's just another wacky fudge factor. <-- which happens to correctly predict real world behavior. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Mar 21 at 12:31
  • $\begingroup$ A question like this is really in need of one or more published sources to give it a credible context. $\endgroup$ – terry-s Apr 8 at 13:37

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