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Until the Abel prize came along, the Fields medals were considered to be the Nobel for math. But when did this tradition of calling it the Nobel for math start and why? Because the prize money is nowhere as much as the Nobels and also the rules governing the two prizes are entirely different.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Danu, Ondřej Černotík, user22, VicAche, Logan M Oct 29 '14 at 20:29

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps this question is a little too opinion-based. $\endgroup$ – Danu Oct 29 '14 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ The answer surely depends on who you ask and by what criteria you judge what it means to be equivalent to a Nobel prize. If prestige is the only criterion, it probably happened fairly early in the history of the prize, but in most other aspects the Fields medal was never really like a Nobel prize at all. So yes, without further specification this seems to me to be too opinionated and broad to be answerable. $\endgroup$ – Logan M Oct 29 '14 at 20:29