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Questions tagged [mathematics-social-history]

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About the LOR of John Nash, was there any relationship between Richard Duffin and Solomon Lefschetz?

In Academia SE, there is a question about the credibility of Prof. Richard Duffin, who wrote the notorious letter of recommendation for John Nash, who later received the Nobel Memorial Prize in ...
Ooker's user avatar
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5 votes
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Who proved Rank Nullity Theorem?

I have been learning about the Rank Nullity theorem and was trying to understand Who came up with the rank nullity theorem? While i did look up on the internet i came up with almost no answers. Some ...
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Why are there relatively many Eastern European (specifically Hungarian) graph theorists?

I noticed that a large number of theories within graph theory are from Eastern European graph theorists, specifically Hungarian graph theorists. What is the relation between Eastern Europe (...
Kroko's user avatar
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What was Littlewood's quip about Hardy and plagiarism?

I'm searching for a quote by Littlewood about Hardy not giving proper credit. The story (as I remember it) is that Littlewood claimed uncredited authorship of something Hardy wrote, Hardy claimed it ...
David Diaz's user avatar
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How and why was catastrophe theory brought to its knees?

How applications of catastrophe theory outside mathematics stalled the theory, and why? I know that the theory had its fair share of popularity during the 1970s, with many distinguished mathematicians ...
Prelude's user avatar
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Were there women inside Bourbaki?

Bourbaki was founded around 1934, they have a limit age of fifty and many mathematicians have passed through it. According to an interview with Chevalley no women have belonged to the group up to 1985....
user234212323's user avatar
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Alhazen's problem history

I was wondering if anyone has read '' alhazen book of optics'' and has understood his solution of Alhazen's problem. I know a modern solution of the problem by Dörrie-100 great problems of mathematics,...
I0_0I's user avatar
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What are Weber class field's weak points?

These days, I'm interested in class field theory. I know that Weber first made his own 'class field' and then Hilbert made his own field, 'Hilbert class field'. By the way, were there so many weak ...
pokssin's user avatar
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Motivation of Monge-Ampere equation

I have a question about Monge-Ampere equation. I read a book The shape of inner space by Shing-Tung Yau. Chapter 5 in this book, Complex-Monge-Ampere equation's explaination was so interesting. In the ...
pokssin's user avatar
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Examples of math problems which exhibited deceptive progress

I'm interested in gathering a list of problems in the history of maths where people were committed to a particular strategy for some time, only to find out that the approach was fundamentally flawed. ...
melembroucarlitos's user avatar
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De Branges's theorem and perspective on Sheaf theory

As far as I know, there is an intuitive and easy way to think about sheaf theory through the Taylor series. For example, in the case of stalk, which is one of the important concepts in sheaf, we can ...
pokssin's user avatar
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Group theory in non-European/subaltern cultures?

I'm doing undergraduate research on the history of abstract algebra (specifically permutation groups) and the notion of symmetric groups in indigenous artwork has come up several times. Is anyone ...
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Motivation of Puiseux's Riemann surface and Galois group theory

If you look at Felix Klein's "Development of mathematics in the 19th century", it says that Puiseux developed the Riemann surface theory to show the connection between the two Galois groups. ...
pokssin's user avatar
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Who made the first (recorded) axiomatic model of nature?

Neil Degrasse Tyson has claimed that, via his Principia, Isaac Newton was the first person (on record) to make a "modern" theory of physics, in the sense that Newton made an axiomatic ...
Daddy Kropotkin's user avatar
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Source of a quote and a story

I read a story and a quote few years ago on a mathematical community in my country and today I just suddenly reminiscend of and want to know whether they are real or not and if it is the former case ...
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Erdos use of amphetamines to stimulate his creativity

What was the dosage of amphetamines that Erdos was taking? Was it a constant dose or did it increase over time? Had he ever been diagnosed as suffering from ADD?
madarab's user avatar
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Are there examples of mathematical systems that reflect the worldview of the culture they are from?

By this I mean, are there systems of numbers, counting, sorting.. or even higher level mathematical concepts that reflect a culture's worldview? Did some cultures not develop certain math concepts ...
Hypatia's user avatar
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historical comments in bad taste

On page 44 of [1] Flanders writes "A treatment from this point of view of exterior calculus which is not quite completely satisfactory and which unfortunately is embellished with historical ...
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Is there any relation between strabismus and mathematical or scientific ability?

By looking at the portraits of prominent mathematicians and scientists of the previous centuries it seems like they have a higher incidence of strabismus than the general population of today. Are ...
GEP's user avatar
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Who invented the first pronunciation system for binary numbers that is roughly analogous to how we pronounce everyday decimal numbers?

Who invented the first pronunciation system for binary numbers that is roughly analogous to how we pronounce everyday decimal numbers (by which I mean how 220 is pronounced 'two hundred twenty')? ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
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Old Indian and Chinese references

It is been some years since I completed my graduate studies in mathematics at a Spanish university. I remember one of the most pleasant and enriching moments I experienced was when reading Euclid´s ...
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