Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [naming-conventions]

For questions about the history and/or rationale behind the names of objects or groups of objects.

0
votes
0answers
60 views

Big list: things used before they were named [on hold]

I would like to compile a big list of things used before they were named. For example, precalculus was named (according to Merriam-Webster) only in 1964, but of course existed before that. community ...
3
votes
2answers
126 views

When and why did people stopped using “natural philosophy” term and started using “science”?

Previously what is called now "natural sciences" was called "natural philosophy". I'm interested in details, what was so wrong with the name "philosophy" so the name "science" became preferred?
7
votes
1answer
159 views

Indiana Pi Bill: Other attempts to establish mathematical truth by legislative fiat?

Wiki: The Indiana Pi Bill is the popular name for bill #246 of the 1897 sitting of the Indiana General Assembly, one of the most notorious attempts to establish mathematical truth by legislative ...
0
votes
1answer
208 views

Resistor color code

I wonder if anyone would know the origin of the Resistor Color Code.
0
votes
2answers
141 views

How come so many laws were not discovered by people they are named after?

Background Stigler's Law of Eponymy states that: Mathematical and Scientific laws/discoveries/inventions/&c. are simply not named after their original discoverer. Stigler's "Law" is a perfect ...
15
votes
2answers
374 views

Why is the Digamma function always denoted with the letter “psi”?

My question is on the notation of the Digamma function. The Factorial function $n!$ (which is met in secondary school), is conceptually seminal to the Digamma function. The Factorial function is ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Was Riddell's formula really so late?

Riddell's formula for unlabeled graphs is a generating function transformation $$1 + B(x) = \exp \sum_{k=1}^\infty \frac{A(x^k)}{k}$$ which gives the number of graphs whose connected components have a ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

What defines the 'name' of a score i.e. gamma, kappa etc

I was just wondering if there is a process or set of properties that exist to name a score, such as, Cohen’s Kappa, Fleiss’ Kappa, Krippendorff’s Alpha, or if it is just at the creators choice. ...
4
votes
1answer
166 views

Binet-Cauchy or Cauchy-Binet?

The Cauchy-Binet formula in linear algebra gives the determinant of a square matrix $AB$ for rectangular matrices $A,B$ of appropriate shape in terms of the determinants of the submatrices of $A,B$. (...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

When did the Bayer designation Gamma Sagittarii become Gamma1 & Gamma2 Sagittarii?

Some authors talk about Gamma Sagittarii as a single star, while others use Gamma1 Sgr for W Sgr and Gamma2 Sgr for 10 Sgr (Gamma Sgr being then ambiguous). SIMBAD database uses Gamma1/Gamma2 as of ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Before the IAU, what was the international governing body for naming astronomical bodies?

Today, the commonly recognized authority on the naming of astronomical bodies is the International Astronomical Union (IAU). It was created in 1919, and quickly rose to a position of prominence within ...
2
votes
3answers
535 views

Why does the start of the calendar year not correspond to a natural event?

Why is Jan. 1, the start of a new year, several days after the Winter Solstice, instead of coinciding with a solstice or equinox or other natural annual event? Note: The question does not ask why ...
2
votes
3answers
387 views

When are units that are named after persons given their names?

There are many scientific units named after people, of which most were given their names a relatively long time ago (Watt, Newton, Celsius, etc). I wonder if the scientists who "discovered" these ...
6
votes
2answers
775 views

Counterclockwise vs. clockwise

It is common for mathematicians to use counterclockwise (ccw) as positive, and clockwise (cw) as negative. For example, trigonometric functions increase from $0^\circ$ along the positive $x$-axis (...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do Maxwell's equations bear his name?

Maxwell's equations in their modern differential form are: $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E} = \dfrac {\rho} {\varepsilon_0}$ (Gauss's law for electricity) $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{B} = 0$ (Gauss's law for ...
5
votes
1answer
203 views

Where did the term “tauon” come from?

The tau particle (so named because it was the third charged lepton, behind the electron and muon) was discovered in the 1970s by Martin Perl and colleagues. In one of the SLAC papers, Perl refers to ...
5
votes
0answers
91 views

Who was the first to use the phrase “the standard model” of something?

I was doing some reading on stellar structure, and I noticed the phrase "the standard solar model" used to describe the structure of the Sun, and stars in general. It reminded me of the Standard Model ...
12
votes
1answer
713 views

How did “royal we” become a standard of scientific writing?

Single authors referring to themselves as "we" is still commonplace today, and already Newton was we-ing in Principia. There is even a Latin term for we-ing, nosism, from "nos", which is Latin for "we"...
7
votes
1answer
634 views

Why is the Heaviside step function named after Heaviside?

The Heaviside step function is usually defined as $$ \theta(x)=\left\{\begin{array}{ll}0&\text{if }x<0\\\tfrac12&\text{if }x=0\\1&\text{if }x>0.\\\end{array}\right. $$ It is ...
13
votes
4answers
682 views

What famous laws were named by their discoverer

A question posed on academia.SE prompts this follow-up question: Is there an example of a famous physical law, constant, equation, theorem etc that was named after its discoverer by the discoverer ...
10
votes
1answer
460 views

Where did the naming structure of particles come from (suffix -on)?

I was looking at a list of particles, and I noticed that many of them ended in -on. Proton, electron, neutron, lepton, etc. Is there a historical (or linguistic) reason behind this naming structure?
7
votes
1answer
108 views

When did the idea of naming asteroids after humans come about?

There are some trends to naming celestial objects: Planets and moons in the solar system may be named after ancient Greek and Roman gods Comets may be named after their discoverer Asteroids may be ...
7
votes
2answers
253 views

When were the abbreviations of chemical elements standardized?

This is going to be tricky because the discovery/synthesis of elements has taken place over centuries. It might be best to restrict this purely to the elements contained on Dmitri Mendeleyev's table, ...
9
votes
1answer
256 views

Why don't we name the Higgs boson a “higgson”?

We have fermions (named after Fermi) and bosons (named after Bose). Why don't we name the particle corresponding to the Higgs field a "higgson"? The superpartner particle (sparticle) of the Higgs ...