Questions tagged [notation]

For questions about the history and development of how symbols and related objects are written.

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Why did Sylvester Gates choose the name Adinkra?

Sylvester James Gates was one of the co-discoverers of Adrinkas. These are graphical representations of susy (supersymmetry) algebras. They are named after a West African people - the Akan of Ghana ...
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Where did the contour integral sign appear for the first time?

A simple question: Where did the contour integral sign appear for the first time? Wikipedia says that it was introduced by physicist Arnold Sommefield in 1917 ( Table of mathematical symbols by ...
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Why are the first three multiplicative SI prefixes lowercase?

The BIPM specifies twenty prefixes for the International System of Units (SI). All ten of the fractional prefixes are lowercase. However, only seven of the multiplicative prefixes are uppercase, the ...
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Origin of (f×g)(x) and (f∘g)(x) notations

Who and when began the writing of function multiplication, $f(x)×g(x)$, as $(f×g)(x)$ and of function composition, $f\big(g(x)\big)$, as $(f∘g)(x)$?
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Why do we use $U$ for potential energy in classical mechanics?

I am unaware if someone has asked this before, but I am studying classical mechanics and I don’t know why do we use $U$ for potential energy. I have read that Rankine used it first, but I can’t find ...
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Has any large group of people used a base other than 10, 20 and 60 for ordinary purposes?

Wikipedia's list of numeral systems lists only $10,20,60$ as having been used in history. There are about twenty-five sets of symbols there used by different groups of people, but only three different ...
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Who introduced the comma notation for partial derivatives?

In general relativity, it is common to use the comma notation for partial derivatives $$\frac{\partial g_{\mu\nu}}{\partial x_\rho} = g_{\mu\nu_,\rho}$$ Where did this notation first appear? Was it ...
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History of points with coordinates notation

In this MathEducator StackExchange article, "Notation of points with coordinates", it's posed the question about what is the best notation for geometrical points and their coordinates: $P(3, ...
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First historical register of an improper fraction [duplicate]

I'm looking for the earliest known written register of an improper fraction, that is, a numerical fraction in which the numerator is greater than the denominator (like 3/2). By the way, who invented ...
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Origin of O/L for false/true in German computer-science texts

In Konrad Zuse's Plankalkül ZIA ID 0020 from 1972, in his patent submission Z23624 "Rechenmaschine" ZIA ID 0177 from 1936 and modern German Wikipedia article on the dyadic system, 2020-01-17 we see L ...
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Who superseded Peano's dot notation in symbolic logic and when?

Bertrand Russel gave an exhaustive treatment of creating mathematics from logic in Principia Mathematica (1910-1913), using the logical notation created by Frege and Peano. As monumental as this is, I ...
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History of exponential notation for the set of functions between two sets

It's well-known that if $A$ and $B$ are two sets, then the set of all functions from $A$ to $B$ can be denoted by $B^A$: explanations of this particular notation can be found in many places: https://...
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Why do Thai numerals look so different than Arabic numerals?

The Arabic numerals I am referring to are “1234567890”. I have read that Thai numerals, “๑๒๓๔๕๖๗๘๙๐”, are actually distantly related. Both descend from the numeral system invented by the Phoenicians, ...
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Why do some people represent vectors with overbars while others use underlines?

When I was originally introduced to vectors, I was told to write them with an arrow above the variable, like so: $$\vec{x}$$ As soon as I began taking vector-heavy classes, I found that those ...
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Origin of $\ll$ notation

Vinogradov introduced the notation $$f(x) \ll g(x)$$ to denote that for some $C>0$, we have $|f(x)|\leqslant C\,g(x)$ for all $x$ under consideration; usually for all $x$ larger than a fixed ...
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Where did Euler prove 'his' theorem on homogeneous functions?

Where in Eulers writings can I find a proof of his homogeneous function theorem: $y$ is a homogeneous function of degree $k$ in $x_1,\ldots,x_n$ iff $ky = \sum_{i=1}^n x_i\frac{\partial y}{\partial ...
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What is the origin of “banana brackets”?

"Banana" brackets are used to denote catamorphisms: Another notation found in the literature is . These symbols are very similar to the composition of a $($ and a $|$, is this similarity more than ...
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Notation from Weyl's algebraic number theory book

In Weyl's "Algebraic Theory of Numbers", which was written in 1940, there are many symbols that look handwritten, such as Fraktur (or Sütterlin, whatever you want to call it) letters for ideals. His ...
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Why is the existential quantifier symbol ∃ a backwards “E”?

Peano introduced a number of logical symbols still used today: $∨$ (from Latin vel) $∧$ (inverted $∨$) $∃$ This inversion of Latin letters as symbols (and inversion of symbols to signify their '...
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Do North Koreans use Latin letters in their equations?

Do North Koreans use Latin (and Greek) letters in their equations? On the one hand, being such an isolationist country, I wouldn't be surprised if they used the Korean alphabet (조선글) in their ...
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Where does $M$ for expected value in Russian papers come from?

In modern papers in statistics, it is common to use the symbol $E[X]$ to refer to the expectation of a random variable $X$. While reading (a translated version of) "Convergence Rate of Nonparametric ...
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Were typographical variations between printings of the same journal article common?

In another question, I was asking about the origin of the reduced Planck's constant, $\hbar \equiv \frac{h}{2 \pi} .$ Specifically, I wanted to know why the symbol $`` \hbar "$ was selected for the ...
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Where did the term “set-builder notation” come from?

In math stack exchange I often see notations like $\{x\in\mathbb Q:x^2<2\}$ being called instances of set builder notation. When I went to school we (that is, I, my fellow students, my teachers, ...
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What is the origin of the $\hbar$ symbol?

Equations involving Planck's constant, $h ,$ are often simplified by instead writing them in terms of the reduced Planck's constant, $\hbar \equiv \frac{h}{2 \pi}.$ But where did the symbol for the ...
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Dimension of the candela unit: What does J stand for?

The J symbol can represent the unit of energy but it's also the symbol for the dimension of the candela (or luminous intensity). For the energy unit, it clearly comes from the family name of the ...
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Who changed $i$ to $j$ in electronics?

In electronics, $j$ is used for a square root of $-1$, because $I$ is current. Who introduced this and when? And was it really necessary, given that (at least now) current's symbol is capitalised? ...
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Is using ~ for “approximately equal” a relic of the typewriter and ASCII era?

In my life¹, I have never seen a symbol other than ≈ used in handwriting to express “approximately equal”. The symbol ~ was only used for more mathematical purposes such as equivalence, ...
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How did the obelus ÷ come to stand for division?

The obelus ÷ represents division on calculator keyboards, and sometimes in elementary education. It has a long non-mathematical history starting before 200 BC. Its ...
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The convention for speakers to refer to themselves at the board with a single initial

I found an interesting question on Math SE asked by @KCd, but it is over four years old without a clear answer. Since it seems to be more on topic here than on Math SE, I thought to post it here in ...
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How long has the order of priority of arithmetical operations been widely taught in high schools?

Browsing Facebook, I often come across posts like this, to test peoples' understanding of order of operations. This inevitably prompts a deluge of answers that either misunderstand the concept or ...
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Why does Michael Stifel's version of Pascal's Triangle look the way it does?

Today I've come across Michael Stifel's version of Pascal's Triangle, which I've seen referred to as the Figurate Triangle or the Triangle of Figurate Numbers as seen in Combinatorics: Ancient and ...
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Is it the 'd' or 'D' operator?

Philip J. Davis' article on the history of the gamma function (PDF) mentions how Leibniz proposed the iterated differential operator (p. 851 in the upper right corner, or p. 3 of the PDF, about half-...
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Communication using mathematical notation among people of different languages

Can it be (are there real examples/anecdotes of) that, say during international séminaires or conferences in mathematics, people of different linguistical origins could understand each other with the ...
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How did the proofs of uniqueness of additive inverses originate historically?

I have encountered various abstract algebra resources that prove the impossibility of number systems with plural additive inverses for a given element, generally through the substitution property of ...
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Who came up with a formula expressing the sign function in terms of the absolute value?

I read here and here that Karl Weierstrass used "| |" to indicate absolute value in 1841. The same sources indicate that Leopold Kronecker wrote of the sign function in 1878. Here it is indicated that ...
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Why are X and Y commonly used as mathematical placeholders?

I realize that X and Y are relatively popular terms when wanting to use a placeholder for an unknown English or math term. What is the origin of this term, and why was it X and Y; why not the other ...
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Origin of arcminutes, arcseconds, “arcthirds,” “arcfourths,” etc

This section of a Wikipedia article says [Modern time and angle notation] contrasts with the numbers used by Hellenistic and Renaissance astronomers, who used thirds, fourths, etc. for finer ...
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Notation for Christoffel symbols

In Christoffel's 1869 paper in which he introduced the Christoffel symbols on the 3rd and 4th pages, they are written as $\left[\substack{ij \\ k}\right]$ and $\{\substack{ij \\ k}\}$. The notation $...
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Earliest drawings of the plots of trigonometric functions

[Even though this question may seem as a duplicate of this question about the History of sine function, I'd like to ask it again - with a more specific title and a more specific focus (on specific ...
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When and why did $\frac{dy}{dx}$ become $\frac{d}{dx}y$?

It's obvious for us, that $\frac{dy}{dx}$ can also be written as $\frac{d}{dx}y$, but skimming through Leibniz or Eulers writings I couldn't see them write the latter. I speculate that this change ...
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Was English mathematics behind Europe by many years because of Newton's notation?

Below are several quotes suggesting that Newton's notation had the effect of retarding English mathematics by 50 years, 100 years, or even centuries. Here is my simplistic two-sentence historical ...
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What does the “G” for the similitude groups stand for?

When we have a bilinear symmetric/ bilinear anti-symmetric/hermitian form $b$ on a real/complex vector space $V$, one can consider the group of invertible matrices $A \in GL(V)$ which respect $b$, ...
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Notation $n=efr$ in algebraic number theory

When $\Bbb Q \subset K$ is a field extension of finite degree and when $p \in \Bbb Z$ is a prime number, the ideal $p O_K$ decomposes uniquely as a product $\prod_{i=1}^r P_i^{e_i}$ of prime ideals of ...
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Where does the letter S in “$S$-units” and in localization $S^{-1} R$ come from?

In number theory, we may encounter the notion of $S$-unit, $S$-integer, etc. where $S$ is a finite set of prime numbers (for simplicity). For instance, if $S = \{2,3\}$ then the $S$-integers are the ...
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What is the history and motivation for the (d-1,1) notation used to describe a field theory?

Very often in the literature of research papers and other articles, and maybe text books, on topics of quantum field theory, a theory may be described as a 3+1 or 0+1, or maybe even 1+1 theory. I ...
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D'Alembertian symbol $\Box$

The D'Alembertian is a generalization of the Laplacian operator to a space of arbitrary dimension and metric. Where does the D'Alembertian symbol $\Box$ come from? According to Wikipedia it has to ...
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Notation for fiber bundles - why E for total space?

I'm looking for info on why E is commonly used for the total space of a fiber bundle. I understand F (fiber) and B (base), but there doesn't seem to be any particularly obvious reason for choosing E.
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Who was the first to use the “does not exist” sign ∄?

Who was the first to use the "does not exist" sign ∄? I'm aware that Giuseppe Peano originated serifed ∃ and, moreover that Whitehead and Russell repurposed Peano's serifed ∃; I'm also aware that ...
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What is the origin of q-calculus notation?

It is kind of cute that q-analogues are used in physics (see this link for example), but it is also kind of confusing because the 'q' does not stand for 'quantum'. It predates that use! So, where ...
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Why is distance sometimes abbreviated S?

While distance in physical formulas is often abbreviated as d (which is pretty intuitive), another common abbreviation is s, as seen e.g. here, here or here. It also seems to be used in optics to ...