Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [publishing]

For questions about historical aspects of the process of publishing results in academic journals or similar platforms for scientific and/or mathematical knowledge.

3
votes
0answers
86 views

Name of the paper that suffered a famous editor mistake

I have heard about a "famous" mistake made on a physics paper by the editor of a scientific journal but I can't seem to find the paper or even to recall what it was about. Has anyone hear of this and ...
3
votes
5answers
459 views

What was the main language in science/mathematics before 1850

I know that English is the most popular language to write scientific/mathematical papers after World War 2. I also know that in the second half of 19th century and first half of 20th century, German ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Author of a review in *Mercure de France*

Would anyone know a way to figure out who wrote the (rather dithyrambic) review of D'Alembert’s Opuscules mathématiques, vol. 6 (1773), found in Mercure de France, April 1773, pp. 127-132? It seems ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Journals of the early 20th century

Which journals were the most commonly used journals for the publication of research papers in physics in the late 19th century and the early 20th century, specifically from 1875 to 1925?
3
votes
4answers
125 views

Time for big results to become widely recognized in the scientific community

What are some examples of big results in mathematics and or physics that took a long time to be considered groundbreaking? What was the length of time from the original publication to the recognition? ...
12
votes
1answer
388 views

How did the publication feat of Einstein's four 1905 Annus Mirabilis papers get through peer review?

Einstein's early career is well-known for the lack of success he had applying for assistant lecturer positions with universities; he could not get a position, and he ended up working in a Bern patent ...
13
votes
4answers
322 views

Are there examples of influential scientific articles first rejected and later proved to be valid?

Can you think of examples of influential scientific articles that at first were rejected by the reviewers but where later recognized as a great and influential contribution?
8
votes
1answer
127 views

Publishing the Principia

It is well-known that Newton's Principia was published by Halley at his own expense, and the story of writing, editing, printing, correction and proofreading is well described in Newton's biographies. ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Are there objective measures for comparing Crelle's Journal to the Annalen circa 1908?

To my eye, the contents of Crelle's Journal (Journal für die reine und angewandte Mathematik) around 1908 (not by chance the year Crelle's published Emmy Noether's dissertation) look very old-...
7
votes
3answers
323 views

Diagrams in early Mathematical Paper Publication

I am reading through the Dover publication of Gauss' work on curves and curved surfaces called "General Investigations of Curved Surfaces". This Dover publication presents two major papers authored ...
14
votes
2answers
461 views

Do the titles starting with “On the …” have a historical tradition?

In my field of research (theoretical physics), titles of publications occasionally begin with "On the ..." (a German language equivalent which was also in use is "Über ... " meaning "About ...".) ...
-1
votes
1answer
466 views

Why are stolen mathematical results attributed to the thief? [duplicate]

For instance, Cardano published the formula for the solution to the cubic after promising Tartaglia he would not, and yet in textbooks the formula is often named after Cardano. What is the reason for ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

Where did d'Alembert published the ratio test?

The Wikipedia article ratio test states that it was first published by Jean le Rond d'Alembert. In which of his works did he state the ratio test?
1
vote
1answer
62 views

How can I be sure that a certain term ocurred first in a certain textbook?

The German Wikipedia article "Bernoulli-Verteilung" ("Bernoulli distribution") claims that the term "Bernoullian trials" occurs first in the textbook "Introduction to Mathematical Probability" by J.V. ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

History of Mac Lane's dissertation on abbreviated proving

Saunders Mac Lane published his thesis (Abgekuerzte Beweise in Logikkalkul) which anticipated to some degree constructing proofs of theorems by constructing programs, giving a sufficient input, and ...
6
votes
1answer
124 views

What are some major examples of rushed scientific publications based on flawed data?

In 2014 BICEP2 made a very controversial press release. It was rushed, given before any papers where published, because they feared they would be scooped by another similar experiment. In the end it ...
3
votes
1answer
135 views

Timeline of Leibniz' Propositional Logic

Gottfried Leibniz developed a system of propositional logic in the late 1600's, which wasn't published until 1903, when it was discovered in the Royal Library of Hanover by Louis Couturat. How did ...
26
votes
3answers
3k views

Writing Mathematical Symbols in 20th century

As I was reading some papers written by Schrödinger and Heisenberg back in 1920s, I noticed that the symbols they use such as the integral or summation sign or calligraphic letters are as if printed ...
4
votes
1answer
153 views

What are some of the most important scientific works done that have not received a Nobel prize? [closed]

Many of the 'famous' papers in the scientific community have resulted in Nobel prizes, but certainly that represents only a small fraction of notably important papers throughout scientific history. ...
13
votes
1answer
528 views

Was Pólya’s “How To Solve It” originally written in German or English (or some other language)?

I seem to fail at googling a simple question: In which language did Pólya originally write “How To Solve It” (or “Schule des Denkens”, as is the German title)? Did he translate the book himself to ...
6
votes
4answers
753 views

What year was Euler's paper on the Konigsberg bridge problem first published?

All the sources I've read say that Leonhard Euler presented his paper on the Konigsberg bridge problem to the St. Petersburg Academy on August 26, 1735. However, they don't seem to agree on what year ...
8
votes
1answer
222 views

Who blocked publication of “Mathematics in USSR. 1958-1967”?

A while ago, in USSR there were published two very voluminous collections entitled "Mathematics in USSR for 30 years. 1917-1947" and "Mathematics in USSR for 40 years. 1917-1957". These collections ...
4
votes
1answer
216 views

Peano's Axioms: their real origin

It is well-known that Guiseppe Peano formalized the axioms that, to some extent, motivated mathematical induction. These are known as Peano's axioms. However, these axioms are often called trivial as ...
4
votes
2answers
335 views

How many papers on general relativity did Marcel Grossmann author or co-author?

Marcel Grossmann is perhaps best known for helping Einstein learn the Riemannian geometry necessary to formulate general relativity. He was instrumental in its early development. Wikipedia states: ...
18
votes
2answers
686 views

What was the last important scientific work written in Latin?

In a recent post on math.se, I suggested that G. Peano's Arithmetices principia, nova methodo exposita (1889) was probably the last important scientific work written in Latin. This work set forth the ...
11
votes
1answer
768 views

Why did Einstein stop publishing so many papers in Annalen der Physik?

In his early years (actually, straight through the early 1910s), Albert Einstein published a lot of papers in Annalen der Phyisk, a very old and prominent German scientific journal. However, this ...
15
votes
1answer
144 views

When did anonymous peer review appear and what were the motivations behind it?

The peer-review process is old. I wonder when anonymous peer review appeared and more importantly what the motivations behind it were (vs. non-anonymous peer review).
5
votes
0answers
60 views

How did research reproducibility in medicine evolve over time?

Some recent studies have analyzed the percentage of research that is reproducible. E.g. Prinz, F.; Schlange, T.; Asadullah, K. (2011). "Believe it or not: How much can we rely on published data on ...
7
votes
1answer
63 views

How did journal subscriptions evolve over time, and what factors account for it?

Nowadays, many academic journals have some impressively high subscription costs. E.g. Harvard's expenditures for library resources in 2012 was $16,391,638. How did journal subscriptions evolve over ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is “Cardano's Formula” (wrongly) attributed to him?

Apparently, Cardano had learned a formula for solving cubic equations from Tartaglia, who had sworn him to secrecy, and in any event, not to publish it without giving Tartaglia due credit. Cardano ...
10
votes
1answer
316 views

What is the history behind the Erdős number?

The Erdős number is used as a tool to study how mathematicians cooperate to find answers to unsolved problems. But what is the history behind the Erdős number?
14
votes
2answers
214 views

What are the earliest accounts of publication bias?

Publication bias is a huge issue is some academic fields. What are the earliest accounts of publication bias? As requested in the comments, publication bias intuitively means that if you read one ...
21
votes
2answers
300 views

How old is the peer-review process in scientific publishing?

Everything is in the title but just to expand on the question, I am wondering if there was any publication process similar to the peer-review process in the past (and when). If not, does it mean that ...
13
votes
1answer
79 views

Have reviewers never been paid?

Nowadays researchers are generally not paid to review research articles. Has it always been the case? If not, how come it has changed?
11
votes
1answer
227 views

Why did 92% of cases of simultaneous discovery in the 17th century end in dispute?

I read on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_publishing : One of the earliest research journals is the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, created in the 17th century. At that ...