16

I do not think the following is true: Why is it so hard for many white scholars and writers of today to acknowledge that Ancient African Mathematicians played a very important role in the development of mathematics. Mathematicians of north Africa, what is present day Egypt, Tunisia (old Carthage), Algeria and Morocco are widely and readily ...


9

It seems that originally ratio and proportion emerged not so much "from nature", as from human activities, first practical and later more theoretical. We often find things in nature only after we already know what to look for. I will give several early examples. In construction of the pyramids ancient Egyptian builders needed to maintain constant slope. ...


9

African mathematicians are acknowledged in history. What is true is that most of the African mathematicians that are acknowledged are North Africans. That's because Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, etc. are on the "southern rim" of the Mediterranean, and was therefore part of the "classical" world of southern Europe and the Middle East. It is also true that ...


8

Like Mauro I suspect that your sources make a conflation. The earliest surviving description of a steam engine is in Pneumatica by Heron (or Hero) of Alexandria, who calls it aeolipile after the Greek god of air. One of the described applications is to automated opening of temple doors by lighting a fire on the altar. Alexandria is in Egypt, which is famous ...


5

Of course, the exact definition of the scientific method is open to discussion (and the scientific method may be very different in different sciences, compare chemistry, astronomy, geology and mathematics, for example). The earliest account that I know of an experimental discovery is physics is credited to Pythagoras. According to the legend, he once ...


5

The claim that Egyptians were aware of the benefits of using cold objects appears to be from the Edwin Smith Papyrus, a famous Egyptian scroll on ancient medicine. I found the abstract of a paper here that goes into some detail: As long ago as 300) BC, the use of cold compresses to treat compound skull fractures and infected wounds were mentioned in an ...


3

The earliest extant description of Erathostenes' method is found in a book by Cleomedes written in the 1st century BC, and no wells are mentioned at all, if it's true that it's stated that whenever the Sun, 'being in Crab at the summer solstice, the pointers of the sundials in Syene throw no shadows...'


3

According to Carl Boyer, in his text A History of Mathematics, the earliest record we have regarding fractions in ancient Egypt comes from the Ahmes Papyrus, popularly known as the Rhind Papyrus, circa 1650 BCE. The scribe, Ahmes, tells us that it is derived from a prototype of the Middle Kingdom, circa 2000-1800 BCE, and it is possible that some of this ...


2

Ritter himself gives a detailed historical account in Closing the Eye of Horus: The Rise and Fall of "Horus-eye Fractions". Egyptians had two forms of writing, hieratic (cursive) and hieroglyphic (pictographic). Ritter traces the origin of the myth to "“central dogma” of our ideas about Egyptan writing: all hieratic signs go back ultimately to pictographic ...


2

To answer the "why" part of your question: In Greek and Roman antiquity there was no economic incentive to produce labour-saving devices due to the ready availability of slave labour. The technological advances were mainly in the field of military technology (think of Archimedes and his burning mirrors).


2

Davidovits' theory appears to be moving slowly from fringe toward mainstream. Also the possibility of a mixed technique i.e. some carved stones along with cast blocks offers a compromise in the debate. why were the pyramids not made wholly of these cast stones? After all it is easier to cast a stone than to cut and hoist it into place. The answer, ...


2

The article does not say what you think it does. The article hypothesizes that the ancient Egyptians used a trundle wheel to accurately measure distance. An estimate of pi is not needed to make an accurate trundle wheel. What's needed is an accurate measure of the circumference. There's no reason to measure the diameter, which is harder to measure accurately ...


1

The foregoing are inferred estimates of pi by the ancient Egyptians. The only explicit mention of a circumference-to-diameter ratio by the ancient Egyptians is 3 in the Demotic Mathematical Papyri.


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