7 votes
Accepted

Aristotelian explanation of magnetism

There is only an small account of Aristotle about magnetism in On the soul (see chapter I.2 and I.5). He discusses Thales of Miletus theory of the motion of lodestone. According to Aristotle, Thales ...
Mauricio's user avatar
  • 3,897
6 votes
Accepted

How did Aristotle explain the motion of living things moving by themselves, and falling of objects, with his hypothesis of all motion needing a cause?

This issue is analyzed by Furley in Self-Movers. Aristotle's answer is somewhat convoluted due to conflicting motives, one from common sense and the other from his cosmology. For falling bodies we ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 76k
4 votes

Did Aristotle note that ships disappear over the horizon hull-first?

From "Queries and Answers," Isis 41, no. 2, linked to by sand1 in the comments above, we see that the proof of the sphericity of the earth based on the fact that the masts of a distant ship are ...
Endy's user avatar
  • 279
4 votes

Did Aristotle note that ships disappear over the horizon hull-first?

I dug up some text from a translation of "on the heavens." There are similar disputes about the shape of the earth. Some think it is spherical, others that it is flat and drum-shaped. For ...
Carl Witthoft's user avatar
3 votes

Was Aristotle really wrong about gravity?

Aristotle concluded in his law of motion that the speed of an object depends on the viscosity of the medium it is in. In keeping with this line of thinking, since a perfect vacuum has zero viscosity, ...
Rudolph Douglas's user avatar
3 votes

Was Aristotle really wrong about gravity?

Physicists now tend to think in terms of effective theories; that is a theory which is accurate in a certain energy regime but fails in another. Thus, for example we get super-gravity as a low energy ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
3 votes

Was Aristotle really wrong about gravity?

Actually Carlo Rovelli considers the situation ignoring any viscosity/friction effects and points out that a body still falls slower in a denser medium. Consider a mass of specific gravity 2 falling ...
watergeus's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What is "female seed" in Galen's work?

Galen's theory of conception, and its relationships to Hippocratic Aristotelian and other ancient theories, is discussed by Boylan in The Galenic and Hippocratic Challenges to Aristotle's Conception ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 76k
2 votes

How did Aristotle die?

There were no Roman soldiers in Greek lands when Aristotle died. Probably he died of natural causes, though I've heard of a speculation that he was murdered on the order of Alexander the great. It is ...
Alexandre Eremenko's user avatar
2 votes

Was Aristotle really wrong about gravity?

Aristotle was considering the max speed of an object being pulled through a resistant media - eg: an ox pulling a cart, or a feather falling through air. It is obvious to any idiot that two 1 lb ...
emtpgeek's user avatar
2 votes

Why did Aristotle make mistakes in his laws of motion?

Everyone makes mistakes. Look at Newton, even though he knew perfectly well that action at a distance was philosophically speaking, nonsense, he still went with it because he could see no way past ...
Mozibur Ullah's user avatar
2 votes

Was Aristotle really wrong about gravity?

Actually, if we are talking about Earth, there is another sense in which Aristotle was (accidentally) right, Earth has an atmosphere, and an atmosphere exerts a drag force on falling objects. It is ...
Roger Walter's user avatar
1 vote

What was Aristotle's experience with vacuums?

The main point is exactly that the ancient scientists could not create vacuum. So they believed that it does not exist. Probably Aristotle himself never really tried, but later ancients invented water ...
Alexandre Eremenko's user avatar

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