13 votes

What does this cover of a 1508 German book on arithmetic depict?

The image appears to depict a counting board. Since the context is mercantilism, it is most likely depicted being used by tax collectors or accountants. The symbols are most likely stylizations.
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  • 5,954
7 votes
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Was the idea that the result of division of positive number by negative number should be negative ever been controversial?

Much has been written about various roadblocks to the acceptance of negative numbers, and I have a folder containing photocopies of a few such papers, but I don't have time now to look for that folder....
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7 votes
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Did Archimedes view fractions as "numbers"?

No, Archimedes, and ancient Greeks generally, did not see fractions as numbers, and they did not use fractions as we use them today, they did not use them at all. What they used was ratios of ...
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6 votes
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Why did the romans use IV and why doesn't it overcomplicate things?

I'd like to add my comment as an answer to have memory of a side comment. As I was saying the subtractive notation was a way of sparing characters in carving and this is the reason behind it becoming ...
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4 votes

What does this cover of a 1508 German book on arithmetic depict?

The image may depict the new form of doing arithmetic by writing numbers, as opposed to the old style of using the counting board. Two image attestations around the same time. A 1503 print of Gregor ...
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  • 401
2 votes
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Is multiplication postulated axiomatically in Peano arithmetic?

There needs to be a distinction made between the terms Peano axioms and Peano arithmetic. The OP is conflating the two terms, hence the confusion. In this wikipedia article (as of 11/21/21), it says, ...
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1 vote

What does this cover of a 1508 German book on arithmetic depict?

It seems to depicture the page setting of a math book in the new technique developed by Johannes Gutenberg. If you look closely you can see the math letters. The year 1508 was within a gold rush ...
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  • 11

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