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The idea of vacuum, or void as it was called in antiquity, did not originally come from considerations about air and Earth's atmosphere, but rather from natural philosophic speculations about the nature of Cosmos, which predate discovering the relation between void and air. Presocratic philosophers starting with Thales considered nothing or void ...


7

Wikipedia's article isn't quite up to snuff. It's rather short and largely skips over the early history of research regarding the ozone layer. Here's what it has to say about it: The ozone layer was discovered in 1913 by the French physicists Charles Fabry and Henri Buisson. Not a lot of great information. Here, though, it is stated that Fabry worked ...


3

I'll expand a little bit my "oracolar" comment above (with less fun) : They have studied physics and mathematics, and physics and mathematics, and ... There was "explorations" of "outer layers" of atmosphere with balloons. There ware the "experiments" made with rockets (mainly German) used during WW II. But mainly, there were faith in the immense power ...


3

My preliminary research starts with the dating of the first scientific studies of air pollution in general. I first cite some dates in a work by E.C. Halliday titled and sourced: A Historical Review of Atmospheric Pollution - Halliday (1961). In this paper, Halliday notes that, while pollution was known to be a social problem starting in the 14th century, ".....


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Henning Ganz in his book Nothingness: The science of empty space contends that the pre-Socratic philosopher Thales of Miletus was the first to consider the question of something vs nothing. But Thales did not ask about empty space. The physics question about the existence and properties of empty space can, in principle, be answered with experiments. In Ganz' ...


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