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This explanation has probably been independently 'rediscovered' many times, and it is unlikely to be able to point to a particular origin. Ackroyd says in 'Babinsky's Demonstration: The Theory of Flight and Its Historical Background' (Journal of Aeronautical History, 2015): Imagine that two adjacent air elements ... A and B ... are about to reach the ...


3

The asymmetric shape (not its explanation with "equal transit time"!) comes from the first mathematical theory that explained the lifting force (Chaplygin's formula, known in the West as "Blasius theorem"). I suppose that the theory of "equal times" was developed in attempts to explain the Chaplygin-Joukowski theory to non-mathematicians:-) Under certain ...


2

"Hat der Körper eine gleichmäßige Geschwindigkeit in ruhender Luft, so wird auch in der den Körper umgebenden Luft eine gleichmäßige Bewegung eintreten, die im wesentlichen darin besteht, daß die Luft vor dem Körper sich auseinander thut und hinter dem Körper wieder zusammengeht." Otto Lilienthal 1889 Which translates as "If the body has a constant speed ...


2

Klaus Weltner and Martin Ingelman-Sundberg (from the Department of Physics at the University Frankfurt) in an ultimately unpublished paper, “Physics of Flight — reviewed”, submitted to the European Journal of Physics in 2003, argue that the original source for the misconception of “equal transit time” was, somewhat unwittingly, aerodynamics pioneer Ludwig ...


2

The popularity of the equal transit-time fallacy is a bit more complicated than a mistake spreading from a single source. It is simple, intuitively appealing (blowing over an airfoil is often invoked, along with an erroneous picture of flow lines around an asymmetric wing), and gets things done quickly. Just like the "explanation" of seasons by the Earth's ...


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