7

This is a great question as it touches on the history-in-the-making, a revolution in molecular biology taking place in our lifetime. In the last two decades the "central dogma" of molecular biology, formulated by Watson and Crick after the discovery of DNA in 1952-1958, has been overthrown. The neat picture of genes, exclusive containers of ...


7

Elizabeth B Gasking summarised the reasons in 1959, but you're not reading it without a Jstor account. Sometimes a paper is overlooked because we think about its relevance from the wrong perspective. It seems even Mendel didn't realise what he'd uncovered. The laws of inheritance that now bear his name, insofar as he formulated them in something close to ...


6

This was almost certainly Luther Burbank. He was a horticulturist who started in Lunenburg, Mass and moved to Santa Rosa, CA in 1875. Burbank developed hundreds of fruit, vegetable, and flower cultivars . His most famous contribution is the "Russet Burbank" potato, which is the most commonly grown potato variety in the US today. Although his methods weren'...


5

The story is told in the Wikipedia article. Mendel's work was not "forgotten" but rather "ignored" because it did not fit in the mainstream science of that time. But some people go to libraries and read old papers. So when discoveries which were "much ahead of its time" are eventually rediscovered it is frequent that someone ...


4

This is a supplement to J.G.'s useful answer: there is a good deal of illuminating source material in William Bateson's (1909) "Mendel's principles of heredity", available at (https://archive.org/details/mendelsprinciple00bate), which was cited by the Gasking 1959 paper. Bateson gave translations of both of Mendel's major papers. Some points from Gasking's (...


4

The Spinal Muscular Atrophy volume gives some historical information on the disease and its treatment in the opening sections. Their timeline and attribution of credit is rather different from that of KEI, especially where Kaspar is concerned. Gene therapy for SMA was made possible by identifying the responsible gene in 1990 by Gilliam’s group in New York ...


3

I can answer this part of the question: "It is likely that he sent one to Darwin, but there is no record of Darwin’s having actually read it." No, Darwin never received Mendel's paper. That author's speculation is wrong. None of his biographers have found evidence of this paper, or that he was aware of its publication. It was in a quite obscure journal. I ...


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