We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
12

As it turns out, it was already known by some philosophers from the 1200s that certain types of rocks naturally tend to rotate to point north. However, they had no idea why: For instance, it was generally thought that compas needles were attracted by the Pole Star. Some more serious work on compasses (e.g. discovering the 'magnetic dip') was first done by ...


8

Cox et al. 1964 gives a good account on the different steps of how this discovery was made. The most important first step was to acknowledge the fact that some rocks (namely magmatic rocks) acquired a remanent magnetism based on the magnetic field in which they were "cooked" (Brunhes 1906). Followed observations of different directions in remanent magnetism ...


5

Actually, Tesla's first major invention was based on his discovery of rotating magnetic field around 1882. To quote colorful description from 1919 Electrical Experimenter:"There is a vast difference between an ordinary electro-magnet and that invented by Tesla. In the former the lines are stationary, in the latter they are made to whirl around at a furious ...


4

According to this article, the name 'tesla' was first suggested to the Technical Committee of the International Electrotechnical Commission in 1950 by two professors from the Belgrade Faculty of Electrical Engineering. The suggestion was accepted by the committee in 1954, and by the International Committee for Weights and Measures in 1956, which also ...


4

As with the previous question on electricity it is ambiguous as to what constitutes "formal equation" or "magnetism". Light is an electromagnetic wave, and geometric optics became mathematical in antiquity, Descartes even introduced wave optics in luminiferous ether in 1638. Peregrinus discovered that lodestones align needles along lines of longitude between ...


4

in 1785, the French physicist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb published his first three reports of electricity and magnetism where he stated his law. The conclusion that there were two types of magnetism, was a natural consequence of the discovery that the poles of a magnet either attract or repel one another. The north (i.e. north-seeking) pole was said to be ...


4

Following the link given in Francois Ziegler's answer I found a Dr. Klein among the signers of a parliamentary petition calling for the modification of section 175 of the German Criminal Code: Petition an die gesetzgebenden Körperschaften des deutschen Reiches behufs Abänderung des § 175 des R.-Str.-G.-B. und die sich daran anschliessenden Reichstags-...


4

The entry is wholly drawn from an ostensibly autobiographical portrait inserted in the “humorvoll” who’s who Das geistige Berlin (1897, p. 245; reprint): Klein, Ad., Dr. med. und phil., geboren zu Merseburg an der Saale am 18. Mai 1829, studirte in Leipzig 1848–51, praktizirte in Königsberg in Ostpreussen 1859–70. Vermählte sich 1860 mit Fräulein Marie ...


3

Pierre de Maricourt (Peter the Pilgrim / Petrus Peregrinus) showed that one cannot isolate a magnetic pole because when a magnetic is divided, the two halves each have a north and south pole: See also: Nicolas Wipf, “Pierre Duhem (1861 - 1916) et la théorie du magnétisme fondée sur la thermodynamique” (Université Lille 1 Sciences et Technologies, 2011) p. ...


3

Some data: The plan for the famous 1867 textbook Treatise on Natural Philosophy by William Thomson (Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Glasgow for over 50 years) and Peter Guthrie Tait contemplated four volumes; the printing of the first volume began in 1862 and was completed in 1867. The other three volumes never appeared. It was ...


2

Einstein's physics teacher, H. F. Weber, apparently did not teach him any Helmholtz, as Einstein wrote in a 10 August 1899 letter to Mileva Marić: I returned the Helmholtz volume* and am at present studying again in depth Hertz's propagation of electric force.** The reason for it was that [I] didn't understand Helmholtz's treatise on the principle of ...


2

On my opinion, the following citation from Poincare answers this question: “At the time, when Maxwell initiated his studies, the laws of electrodynamics adopted before him explained all known phenomena. He started his work not because some new experiment limited the importance of these laws. But, considering them from a new standpoint, Maxwell noticed that ...


1

I'm certainly no expert on the history of these models, and can only answer from my working knowledge about the topic. (In particular, I'm not quite the right person to give a detailed comparison with the Hubbard model.) Nevertheless, the text below is too long for a comment, and it might still be of some help. I do not claim completeness, but think that ...


1

There are two reasons: As explained by Alexandre Eremenko, the laws of electrodynamics before Maxwell (like Ampere's force law, Neumann's law of induction, Weber's law, etc.) explained all the known phenomena in an action at a distance manner. When action at a distance theories fell out of favour, the pioneers of these theories were mostly discredited. Not ...


1

These 2 volumes discuss research and academic courses in physics in the 19th century at German universities: Christa Jungnickel and Russell McCormmach. Intellectual Mastery of Nature. Theoretical Physics from Ohm to Einstein, Volume 1: The Torch of Mathematics, 1800 to 1870. University of Chicago Press, paper cover, 1990a. ISBN 0-226-41582-1. Volume ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible