Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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The Russians picked up a similar number of "rocket scientists" as the West, but the lesser ones. These were taken to newly-constructed but isolated scientific facilities at places like Gorodomiya Island on a lake northwest of Moscow. They were housed with Russian scientists in relatively comfortable (by Russian standards) facilities, near their place of ...


14

The most famous mathematicians who were the members of NSDAP are Ludwig Bieberbach and Oswald Teichmuller. I am not sure which "Hilbert" is mentioned in the question but mathematician David Hilbert certainly was not a party member, and had very negative attitude to the Nazis.


7

Many German scientists were either captured by the Soviet army or were surrended to the Soviets after their capture by Western armies. All of these scientists were enslaved by the Soviets and forced to work on various scientific projects. The experience of one of Germany's greatest scientists, Manfred von Ardenne, is representative. After voluntarily ...


7

It never got off the drawing board (literally). I have a few sources that suggest that the scientists never got beyond some basic technical drawings and schematics related to the Sun Gun. Admittedly, they aren't the best sources I could hope for, but they agree, so I'm inclined to believe them. The idea was conceived by Hermann Oberth in 1923 (and ...


7

This is not a definitive answer, bu I did not find any proof that the Nazis had prohibited any German scientists from keeping a Nobel Prize. The story of how their medals were kept safe breaks into two parts: the first part is why they sent their medals to Denmark, and the second is why they were dissolved. There seems to be few years gap between the two ...


7

The mathematician who would be famous if he was no member of the ss / nazi party /died in a POW camp is I think Gerhard Gentzen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerhard_Gentzen He invented/rigouously described natural deduction https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_deduction and sequent calculus but is well writtten out of the history In philosophy ...


6

After the Second World War, Operation Paperclip was started to bring certain top German scientists to America. Many of these had worked on military applications for the Nazis (developing rockets etc.), and some may have been involved with the Nazis in other capacities as well. A short list of the more famous scientists includes Wernher von Braun Kurt Tank -...


6

On my opinion, there are two important reasons: a) German government did not press the matter. Nobody convinced it that the thing is plausible and important. (In the US there was a lobby who could convince the US president in this. Szilard, V. Bush and Einstein played an important role). b) I think even if they wanted, they could not do it. They simply ...


6

Yes. I only have one source so far (unfortunately), but it does give quite a bit of information. It's the aforementioned NY Times book review, accessible here. What is says is amazing: German scientists (not necessarily Nazis) were the first to do research on many different facets of cancer. Much of this was pre-Third-Reich, in the glory days of late 19th-...


6

Unlike the short-range rockets which are all solid fueled, making a solid-fuel long range rocket is very challenging. The main technical problem is that the fuel block which is very large can develop a crack under mechanical and thermal stress. The flame will immediately spread into the crack, and the whole thing will explode. The second difficult problem ...


5

Julius Pawel Schauder was a very famous mathematician. He worked in Lwow (Lviv, Lvov, Lemberg). He is remembered for the "Leray-Schauder degree", and "Leray-Schauder Theorem", this is a cornerstone of the important area called Non-linear Functional Analysis, "Schauder basis" and many other things. He worked in functional analysis, and in fact was one of the ...


5

For the second one, see: Maria Georgiadou, Constantin Carathéodory: Mathematics and Politics in Turbulent Times (2013), page 584: the mathematician Schauder [...]. The name is wrongly spelled as "Schouder". Juliusz Paweł Schauder (September 21, 1899, Lwów, Austria-Hungary – September 1943, Lwów, Occupied Poland).


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There is an indirect connection between the works of Lenard and the Curies. This link is exactly the work of Röntgen and the influence it had. Let me expand on this a bit. Lenard was unhappy that the public attributed the discovery of X-rays entirely to Röntgen. He believed that he should also be acknowledged, because Röntgen's discoveries were made by ...


4

He introduced groupoids and did some work on quadratic forms and quaternions, but I don't think he is considered a famous scientist: Heinrich Brandt. However, he was a very active Nazi, being a member of some Nazi organisations and most notably, he was a Förderndes Mitglied der SS. (According to German Wikipedia, referencing Harry Waibel, Diener vieler ...


4

“Cammaille” or “Camaille” sound like misspellings for Jean Cavaillès. This seems confirmed by CERN Bulletin Issue No. 18/1999, which on page 15 (numbered 2) quotes Catherine Chevalley: Heisenberg the physicist who “apparently tried, from within Germany, to save Cavaillès”$^1$. $^1$Catherine Chevalley: in her preface to “Werner Heisenberg” (see ...


2

By accident I stumbled upon a recent article about the topic in a german science journal: http://www.spektrum.de/magazin/warum-es-hitlers-atombombe-nie-gab/1427403 It is based on a the following publication: Popp. M.: Misinterpreted Documents and Ignored Physical Facts: The History of "Hitler’s Atomic Bomb" Needs to be Corrected. In: Berichte zur ...


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As regards the Soviet's quick progress on the bomb please read Dark Sun which is Richard Rhodes second book on the making of the atomic bomb. Early on he describes the wholesale shipping of plane loads of secrets to the soviets by their well respected U.S patriot spies here. The reasons given are well considered but unmentioned is Hitler's impatience which ...


1

Given enough time and resources, the Germans would have produced a bomb. What held them back was firstly that they were persecuting a large section of their existing scientific and engineering community (many literally going up the chimney) - either for their political views (socialists and communists) or because of their ethnic background (Jews). The ...


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