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2 votes

Online resources for 19th century physics textbooks

This question asks for book-references to what it calls "Newton's force equation", written in a certain way (involving the sum of two masses). Normally, an answer could just be book-...
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Is Newton's Gravitational Constant G a force?

This is a supplement to @Miyase's answer. (a) To the question in the headline, "Is Newton's Gravitational Constant G a force?" : No, as @Miyase already said, it isn't. It's a constant of ...
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1 vote

Deflection of the pendulum arm in Cavendish experiment

Cavendish takes the difference of the positions of the "Point of rest" before and after he moves the weights. So when the weights are in positive position, the point of rest is at $24.9$ ...
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2 votes

Newton's Corollary #1 to the Laws of Motion (Principia)

The question you raise is a good one, and it has to do with two of the laws of motion, both the first law (about inertia and the lack of need for any external influence to maintain an existing ...
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Newton's Corollary #1 to the Laws of Motion (Principia)

Seems silly to answer my own question, but maybe this will help someone later on. After some digging around, I realized my confusion was due to a misunderstanding of Newton's use of "impressed ...
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3 votes

Is Newton's Gravitational Constant G a force?

$G$ can't be a force for a number of reasons: It doesn't have the unit of a force. It's a plain number, while a force is a vector. It's constant, while a force can vary. The way I understand the ...
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