Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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19

It is not random. These names are of Greek origin, and -ic or -ics are Anglicizations of the Greek suffix -ikos, which meant "pertaining to". In other languages it can be rendered as -ika or -ica, Wolfram's "Mathematica" uses such a version. From the Online Etymology Dictionary: "-ics in the names of sciences or disciplines (acoustics, aerobics, ...


7

It came to physics a bit earlier than quantum mechanics. The homomorphism $SU(2)\to SO(3)$ was discovered by Cayley (1843), Hamilton (1847), and Klein (1875) in their pure mathematical studies, and came to the attention of physicists through the theory of rigid body rotation (classical mechanics). It was Klein who brought it to the attention of physicists. ...


5

The use of reduced mass in spectroscopy goes back to Bohr's planetary model of the atom. Nasri explains the context in his notes on quantum mechanics: "In 1912, Alfred Fowler showed that similar lines can be produced in a laboratory mixture of hydrogen and helium gas. Bohr noticed that they have the same spectrum of spectral lines as of hydrogen but with ...


4

I will assume "non-instantaneous" means something other than electric discharge in the atmosphere, from animals like eels and torpedo fishes, or electrostatic generators like the Leyden jar or the van der Graaf generator. Then the answer is the voltaic pile invented by Volta in 1799, "the first electrical battery that could continuously provide an electric ...


4

Not quite as specific as what you're looking for, but searching google-books using the phase "positive electron" for 1800-1931 gives several pages of hits. Most of these use the phrase in connection with atomic nuclei (or with alpha particles, prior to Rutherford's famous scattering experiment), but some appear to involve speculation about the existence of a ...


3

Curious award, issued by Northrop Grumman Corp., the common abbreviation seems to be "Grumman medal". Appears to be out of circulation since 1990s. Aside from Wilson (1986) and Ufimtsev (1991), some recipients were Paul Chu (1987), Russell Messier (1987), Burt Rutan (1989), John Huizenga (see p.50) (1991), and Edward Stone (see p.37) (?). Unfortunately, ...


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