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4

Electronics, (subtitled 'radio, communication, industrial applications of electron tubes ... engineering and manufacture') was published by McGraw Hill. Not a journal per se, more of an industry magazine. One place to find old copies is through World Radio History, which includes a pdf of the April 1936 issue in question. Indeed, on page 14 is the article ...


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Wikipedia describes the House of Broglie: Broglia [it] (pronounced [ˈbrɔʎʎa]) was the name of an old Piedmontese family, from which were descended the counts of Casalborgone, Mombello and Revello, and the lords of Arignano, Cortandone, Fontanetto Po, Chieri, Cocconato, Monale, Montaldo,[8] Pont Canavese and Santena. The first reference to the name is dated ...


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Actually, it wasn't Dirac who first found that relation. It was already used by Planck as early as in 1906 while deriving the Hamiltonian equations of motion Planck: The Principle of Relativity and the Fundamental Equations of Mechanics (1906). He first gave the Lagrangian function $$ (1)\quad L={\dot {x}}{\frac {\partial H}{\partial {\dot {x}}}}+{\dot {y}}{\...


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It is not that it had to wait to be "established", it is obtainable from what was known by trivial algebra, but rather that it had to wait for a reason to write it that way. In the early years of relativity the concept of the "electromagnetic mass" of electron was prominent, which suggested that said mass is velocity dependent. It was at ...


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What was known about the properties of the nucleus (its shape, its density etc) and the nuclear forces before the Liquid drop model was proposed? In 1897 Thomson discovered the negatively charged electron. This prompted a revolution in thinking about the structure of the atom which before then had hardly been theorised. Thomsons discovery suggested that ...


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Dugas’ History of Mechanics (French ed 1958) starts with Aristotle followed by Archimedes. Then Hellenistic and Arabic science, followed by Middle Age and Renaissance. Thus it is old but quite comprehensive.


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Sizes and masses were roughly known since Rutherford's 1911 experiments. Gamow references some more precise measurements from 1920s in Mass Defect Curve and Nuclear Constitution. For example, size measurements of Bieler from 1924 and Hardmeier from 1927 for light elements, and of Houtermans with Atkinson and with him from 1928-9 for heavy elements. The data ...


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Because otherwise historians had to admit that Christianity, by destroying the ancient civilization, caused a regress. Even if after the fall of the Roman Empire the population experienced some relief, ultimately the whole Western world stagnated and sunk culturally. Quantitative data is available through Ian Morris project (Why the West Rules - For now, ...


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A few musings (at least one of which, I think, qualifies this to be an answer rather than a comment): Strictly speaking, the quantities about which OP is asking are "uncertainties", not "errors" ("uncertainty" means the standard deviation of the forward probability distribution of a measurement given a fixed true value of the ...


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I find this question baffling. Why would anyone be interested in 'propagating errors?'! Surely the question ought to be on estimating errors? Experimental physicists are only interested in how errors propagate in order to estimate errors - it's not an end in itself, but a means to an end and even then, the end here is to establish the level of confidence we ...


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I came across this question while trying to figure out when the "law of propagation of error" was first stated, which resulted in this question: When was the "Law of Propagation of Error" first stated? which now contains a reference to your question. Your question is about when error propagation become prominent (rather than about when it ...


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Newton is 'venerated' for his synthesis of the laws of motion, the theory of gravity and the calculus. Virtually everything he did had some antecedent in work earlier than his, but he put it all together. Buridans name 'has faded into obscurity' not because of the lack of the importance of his work, but simply because the history of science is not taken as ...


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I agree with Patrice Ayme on the topic of Buridan and will add that one major role of those employed in a teaching role at a university should be to provide comments and ideas that are helpful to the progress of thought. In this he was clearly successful in spite of religious leaders who had immense power to destroy those who opposed them. The fact that ...


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Jeff Miller's very valuable collection of the origins of mathematical expressions has the entrie "Integration around a closed path": Dan Ruttle, a reader of this page, has found a use of the integral symbol with a circle in the middle by Arnold Sommerfeld (1868-1951) in 1917 in Annalen der Physik, "Die Drudesche Dispersionstheorie vom ...


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Personally I'm surprised that this is the case given that for hundreds of years Europe was Christian and the biblical Genesis quite matter of factly said that the universe was created. It's strange that this didn't factor in their speculations about the universe and its history. Still, it's understandable. After all, if the universe was created then it would ...


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Proportion is the key concept that underlies most of mathematics. In its modern guise, it's described as the straight line or linearity. Now consider that the epitome of motion in Newtons theory is straight line motion. Further consider that Einstein then described motion in GR as straight lines on a curved surface. More, consider that calculus is simply the ...


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Atomic theory was predicted 2,500 years ago by Democritus and Leucippus and it did revolutionise physics once that scale could be probed. In fact, it's revolutionary potential was such that Feynman wrote in his lectures that if all scientific knowledge was forgotten and one sentence was to be preserved for future generations then he would pick 'all things ...


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Lots of mathematical physicists don't actually care about the physics and focus on the mathematics. This is not new with string theory. What is new with string theory is that a great deal of mathematics which did not seem to have direct physical applications were found to have such an interpretation. This in itself isn't particularly surprising since a great ...


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No, he didn't. In fact he is known for coming up with his own interpretation of QM that relies on a non-local pilot wave. It's usually referred to as de Broglie-Bohmian mechanics as de Broglie, earlier, had similar ideas. He is also known for developing a notion of implicate and explicate order in QM, writing: I propose that each moment in time is a ...


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