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4

The controversy was not so much about the tension between vis viva and mechanics, as about what is the "true" quantity of motion, vis viva or momentum, and what is the "metaphysical" basis upon which mechanics is to be built, vis viva or Newton's force (aside from multiple other side issues that got entangled with it, see What was the vis ...


4

The German DIN Norm 461 from 1973 explicitly says, that units must not be put in brackets and further relates to DIN 1313. The first version of DIN 461 is from 1923. Die Einheit darf keinesfalls in Klammern gesetzt werden (siehe DIN1313) According to DIN, the square brackets are used as an operator to extract the unit from a physical quantity and curly ...


8

The comments correctly say that this happens all the time. For a recent example, you can see my answer to: Can a highly-cited published paper have this type of error? I will explain here some details which were not described in that answer (since your question is a slightly different one). The paper Engel et al., Nature. (2007) 446, 782-786 "Evidence ...


2

To return to this old question with at least a partial answer: there really was a book called "Hundert Autoren gegen Einstein"; you can read it here: https://archive.org/details/HundertAutorenGegenEinstein It was published in 1931, two years before the Nazis came to power, and several of the authors, including the one named first on the title page, ...


1

''When asked to comment on this denunciation of relativity by so many scientists, Einstein replied that to defeat relativity one did not need the word of 100 scientists, just one fact.'' Encyclopedia Britannica Link https://www.britannica.com/biography/Albert-Einstein/Nazi-backlash-and-coming-to-America


2

I have found a provisional answer to my own question. For the time being I will not accept it because it does not mention either Léon Brillouin or Robert Andrews Millikan. I still hope someone will come up with a source for one of both of them. But Larmor was most certainly a "serious" physicist of that time (a "great" physicist would be ...


2

It was Euler c. 1740s, Principia motus fluidorum was read to the Academy in 1752, but published even later. Daniel Bernoulli, who is sometimes also credited, did not introduce not only the velocity potential, but even the "Bernoulli equation" named after him. Lagrange derived it in 1788 from Euler's equations of motion for incompressible fluids, ...


5

The potential is not introduced in Hydrodynamica. Here is from The Oxford Handbook of the History of Physics, p.366: "Gravitational potential appeared implicitly in the form of the integral of force in Johann Bernoulli’s formula for the motion of a point under the action of a central force (1712). Bernoulli did not connect his result with the ...


1

The uranium came from Belgian Congo, more precisely, from the Katanga Province. See this article explaining the central role of Edgar Sengier, ruler of the very powerful (Belgian) Union Minière du Haut Katanga (Katanga Mining Union), who in September 1940 secretly sent, without being ordered by anybody, around 1000 tons of especially rich uranium ore to ...


0

I really doubt this would have been possible, since Maxwell’s equations were discovered only in the later-mid century. On the other hand, it took around 150 years for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics to appear after Newton.


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