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15

Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1949), pp. 33-34:A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.as quoted in:• M. López Corredoira and C. Castro Perelman, ...


10

The quote is not accurate but Gauss actually wrote something similar to Schumacher in the letter of 1 November 1844 cited here, where he complains about concepts and definitions given in math books by philosopher that are not mathematicians, namely [...] look around at modern philosophers [...] don't their definitions make your hair stand on end? Read in ...


10

Almost. E P Wigner (1960), Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics 13 1–14 The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences THERE IS A story about two friends, who were classmates in high school, talking about their jobs. One of them became a statistician and was working on population trends. He showed a reprint to his ...


9

The story is genuine. Isaacson retells it in his scientific biography Einstein: His Life and Universe based on recollections of his younger sister Maja, along with other evidence that dispels the early "Einstein was a slow starter and flanked school" story exaggerated by his parents: "His uncle Jakob Einstein, the engineer, introduced him to the joys of ...


7

Elementarmathematik vom höheren Standpunkte aus, Bd.2 Was eine Kurve ist, glaubt jeder Mensch zu wissen, bis er so viel Mathematik gelernt hat, daß ihn die unzähligen möglichen Abnormitäten verwirrt gemacht haben. see also Quotations by Felix Klein for the English version.


6

You can find the quote (or something similar) in multiple places in the Théorie analytique de la chaleur, for example in Chapter I, paragraph (article) 14: "L'examen de cette condition fait connaître que l'on peut développer en séries convergentes, ou exprimer par des intégrales définies, les fonctions qui ne sont point assujéties à une loi constante, et ...


6

“Mathemata mathematicis scribuntur.” is the original Latin of Copernic which is easily translated as “Mathematics is written for mathematicians.” but Edward Rosen chose to translate this famous passage as “Astronomy is written for astronomers.” Obviously "astronomy" is not the author's word and also it is generally agreed that there was no ...


5

Ostrogradsky is well-known for his negative reaction to Lobachevsky's work, but in his signed reviews, at least, his complaints were different. Lobachevsky, in contrast to Ostrogradsky, was not a good expositor, and the paper he submitted to the Academy was obscurely written. Apparently, Ostrogradsky was only able to make sense of two integrals computed ...


5

Yes. The menstrual cycle is surely one of the "some of our functions" that Darwin speaks of in this passage: "The progenitors of man must have been aquatic in their habits. … In the lunar or weekly recurrent periods of some of our functions we apparently still retain traces of our primordial birthplace, a shore washed by the tides." Descent of Man, Chapter ...


4

The fourth quote is found in the posthumous work "Anecdotes, Observations and Characters, of Books and Men" Vol 1 (page 158), by the historian Joseph Spence (1820). They are reported to have been uttered by Newton just before his death (1727) to Chevalier Andrew Michael Ramsey (though the latter was recorded to be in France at the time). The second probably ...


3

90% it was a physicist from the late 19 or early 20th century Excellent memory! It is actually from Thomas Kuhn who was a physicist, and who later turned into a philosopher. His book The Structure of Scientific Revolution mentions something like this on page 152. This is the third edition 1962 reprinted in 1996. Edits: On page 151, he also quotes Planck.


2

No, Ostrogradski did not say this in his report on Lobachevski's work. His main argument was that this is a "futile phantasy", with no applications. He did not dispute the logical consistency of the theory, but at that time the common opinion was that mathematics has to describe the so-called "real world". He criticized the absence of applications, or more ...


1

I found this statement in a short IAS article, In [Conway's] view, conformal field theory is too complicated to understand, and thus too complicated to be the only answer. However, seeing as Conway's work on the Monster group and 'moonshine' seems to predate its proposed application to string theory by a number of years, I'm a bit skeptical that he ...


1

The answer appears to be "everyone." First hit included: “The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality.” ― Dante Alighieri “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. If an elephant has its foot on the tail of a mouse, and you say that you ...


1

I think the conclusion here is that there is no proof that the claimed Fourier quote is an actual Fourier quote (in any language). However, (1) Absence of proof is not proof of absence. (2) Although Fourier may have not communicated the quote in substance, he did arguably communicate the quote in essence. Possibly what happened was that someone wrote a ...


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