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15

Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1949), pp. 33-34:A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.as quoted in:• M. López Corredoira and C. Castro Perelman, ...


13

"Did Rolle ever say/write any such thing (as that the calculus was 'a collection of ingenious fallacies')?" Michel Rolle (France, 1652-1719) certainly did attack the mathematical basis of the infinitesimal calculus. I haven't found the exact phrase attributed to him by the authors quoted in the question, but there are plenty of broadly similar attacking ...


8

The story is genuine. Isaacson retells it in his scientific biography Einstein: His Life and Universe based on recollections of his younger sister Maja, along with other evidence that dispels the early "Einstein was a slow starter and flanked school" story exaggerated by his parents: "His uncle Jakob Einstein, the engineer, introduced him to the joys of ...


7

Elementarmathematik vom höheren Standpunkte aus, Bd.2 Was eine Kurve ist, glaubt jeder Mensch zu wissen, bis er so viel Mathematik gelernt hat, daß ihn die unzähligen möglichen Abnormitäten verwirrt gemacht haben. see also Quotations by Felix Klein for the English version.


5

Ostrogradsky is well-known for his negative reaction to Lobachevsky's work, but in his signed reviews, at least, his complaints were different. Lobachevsky, in contrast to Ostrogradsky, was not a good expositor, and the paper he submitted to the Academy was obscurely written. Apparently, Ostrogradsky was only able to make sense of two integrals computed ...


5

Yes. The menstrual cycle is surely one of the "some of our functions" that Darwin speaks of in this passage: "The progenitors of man must have been aquatic in their habits. … In the lunar or weekly recurrent periods of some of our functions we apparently still retain traces of our primordial birthplace, a shore washed by the tides." Descent of Man, Chapter ...


4

The fourth quote is found in the posthumous work "Anecdotes, Observations and Characters, of Books and Men" Vol 1 (page 158), by the historian Joseph Spence (1820). They are reported to have been uttered by Newton just before his death (1727) to Chevalier Andrew Michael Ramsey (though the latter was recorded to be in France at the time). The second probably ...


3

90% it was a physicist from the late 19 or early 20th century Excellent memory! It is actually from Thomas Kuhn who was a physicist, and who later turned into a philosopher. His book The Structure of Scientific Revolution mentions something like this on page 152. This is the third edition 1962 reprinted in 1996. Edits: On page 151, he also quotes Planck.


2

No, Ostrogradski did not say this in his report on Lobachevski's work. His main argument was that this is a "futile phantasy", with no applications. He did not dispute the logical consistency of the theory, but at that time the common opinion was that mathematics has to describe the so-called "real world". He criticized the absence of applications, or more ...


1

Here is a source from psu.edu in which Marc P quoted Einstein The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.186.4598


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