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What we call now astronomy and what we call astrology have been one and the same thing for millennia, and it was so at Galileo's time. The reason for studying the motion of planets relative to the stars was to predict their position for oracular responses, or to pinpoint their past position at birth's time for compiling horoscopes. The fact that (as stated ...


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Nick Kollerstrom in his online Galileo's Astrology points out: In 1609 Galileo moved to Florence. In 1610, his revolutionary best-seller, Sidereus Nuncius (The Message of the Stars), appearing in March 1610, opened with an eloquent account of the traditional qualities assigned to Jupiter and he states: "Who, I say, does not know that these qualities, ...


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Rutkin D., Galileo Astrologer, Galileana II 2005 p 107-143 "Favaro (in vol.19 of the Ed.N) transcribed and published the astrological judgments written in Latin of Galileo's two daughters which along with the construction of his own horoscope undercuts the argument that Galileo only practiced astrology toward patronage ends. In addition to those of his ...


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The Galileo's astrology activities are well summarized in Conifold's answer. But, in relevance to the question at hand (did he believe it worked) I'd like to make a couple of points: The fact that Galileo was making horoscopes of people of power and wealth doesn't really mean he believed that they actually meant anything. He could have been motivated by ...


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Galileo not only believed but taught and actively practiced astrology, like Ptolemy and Kepler before him. His primary source might have been Porphyry’s commentary on Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos. In particular, he constructed and interpreted horoscopes, including ones for himself and his daughters that are extant. His discovery of the moons of Jupiter was followed ...


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