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2

In 1978, I formulated a summation series equation that yielded the cubes of the counting integers. I sent it to Scientific American, NCTM (The National Council Of Teachers Of Mathematics), and others. In November (1978) in their journal the The Mathematics Student (Vol. 26 No. 2), NCTM published not the equation, but instead the expansion of the summation ...


3

Thanks to Google Scholar, I found out that my name was listed on this 2014 paper without the knowledge of any of the listed co-authors (including myself). I do know the listed co-authors (including the person who published the paper online), and had been working on projects with them, but I did not know that a paper with this title was posted online without ...


1

Not sure if it counts, but the name of Kolmogorov certainly reminded me that according Yaglom (A. N. Kolmogorov as a Fluid Mechanician and Founder of a School in Turbulence Research) Obukhov only learned about his important contributions to the theory of local structure of turbulence being incorporated into the manuscript published by Kolmogorov at a ...


3

If the film 'The Man Who Knew Infinity' is to be believed, Hardy submitted Ramanujan's paper on highly divisible integers without his (Ramanujan's) knowledge. In more detail, in his book 'The Man ho Knew Infinity: a Life of the Genius Ramanujan, Robert Kanigel states that the paper Ramanujan, S. (1915). "Highly composite numbers" ). Proc. London ...


6

I have a paper with 5 co-authors which was written and submitted to a journal without my approval, and even without notifying me about it. The editor handling the paper informed me about it but it was published without my approval. The good outcome was that as a result of this paper my Erdos number is 2 because one of the 5 co-authors was a co-author of ...


15

In theoretical physics, the celebrated 1948 Alpher–Bethe–Gamow paper, or αβγ paper on cosmic nucleosynthesis. Bethe's name was thrown in, unbeknownst to him, at first, as a practical joke, for which G Gamow was notorious, to rhyme with the Greek alphabet; but it is not as though his friend Bethe, the pioneer of nucleosynthesis, was alien to the field. The ...


5

Probably the most famous historical example is the Tartaglia-Cardano affair, where Cardano published the solution to a case of depressed cubic he learned from Tartaglia in Ars Magna after swearing on the Gospels not to do it, see e.g. Feldmann, The Cardano-Tartaglia Dispute and Why is "Cardano's Formula" (wrongly) attributed to him? Tartaglia was ...


8

The comments correctly say that this happens all the time. For a recent example, you can see my answer to: Can a highly-cited published paper have this type of error? I will explain here some details which were not described in that answer (since your question is a slightly different one). The paper Engel et al., Nature. (2007) 446, 782-786 "Evidence ...


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