paul garrett
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Is the number of PhDs who berated Marilyn von Savant's answer to the Monty Hall problem exaggerated?
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3 votes

To add just a bit to the great documentation in the question, and to Dave Renfro's and Conifolds accurate/helpful comments: First, as in the question, the actual conduct of Monty Hall in the TV show ...

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Why does the "Principle Of Permanence" have two different definitions?
1 votes

Yes, there are at least four somewhat-different things that have either been called a "principle of permanence" historically, or might be called so currently. The easiest to explain (and ...

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How was Fourier analysis important to the development of set theory?
4 votes

Unfortunately, I do not have a concrete reference... but I seem to recall that Cantor's earliest work was about "sets of uniqueness" for Fourier series (I think not Fourier transforms, but I ...

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How to pronounce Jacobson
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4 votes

When I was a sort of postdoc at Yale in the mid-to-late 1970s, Nate Jacobson was still very much alive and doing stuff. His name was always pronounced "in the American style", not with "...

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What does "given in species" mean in old geometry textbooks?
1 votes

This terminology does appear in English 100+ years ago, and is arguably archaic, but just means "types" or "kinds".

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Claims of mathematical breakthroughs while in an altered state of consciousness?
2 votes

Bob Thomason attributed of co-authorship to his deceased (former??) collagorator Tom Trobaugh for a significant paper, due to Trobaugh's coming to him in a dream with critical ideas. (Thomason has a ...

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Have orthogonal complex matrices appeared in the literature?
5 votes

Yes, orthogonal matrices with complex entries appeared at least as early as 1900, in E. Cartan's classification of simple Lie algebras (and Lie groups). In many ways, the complex numbers could be ...

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Women in mathematics
5 votes

Margaret Murray's "Women Becoming Mathematicians" (MIT Press) is great. Also, Prof. Murray has a website with even more info: https://womenbecomingmathematicians.net/ (All in English.)

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Were tables of square roots ever in use?
2 votes

In addition to the existence of such tables, (in the later 1960's, for example) high school math classes included some lessons on (linear) interpolation from the values given in tables. And some of ...

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What brought about the need for real analysis and formal logic in recent years?
2 votes

A different thread (in addition to one of my favorites, Fourier's extravagant claim that "every" [sic] function was "expressible" [sic] in trigonometric series (by the way, the pointwise convergence ...

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How did German become the language of science?
2 votes

A brief nubbin of an answer, but I think neglected by other answers: Bismarck's big centralized push to subsidize science and industry, in order to overtake Britain in such, in particular (and perhaps ...

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