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I'd like to read something about the history of women in mathematics. I'd love to have reading suggestions of books in English or Italian, of 3 kinds:

1) History of math books, academic style;

2) Popular mathematics books, for a broader audience;

3) Books for young girls (8-11yo), possibly in Italian.

Thanks.

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  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of hsm.stackexchange.com/q/2940/2066 . Their accomplishments is extremely small compared to men. $\endgroup$ – Paracosmiste Nov 3 at 20:22
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    $\begingroup$ How is that a duplicate? I am interested in book-references, not in names or theorems of female mathematicians. $\endgroup$ – Alberto Saracco Nov 4 at 8:30
  • $\begingroup$ The answers and references given there can make a book. There's many many books on the topics you want but if you only want to focus on a tiny part of mathematicians, you'll get very few number of such books. $\endgroup$ – Paracosmiste Nov 4 at 20:12
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Margaret Murray's "Women Becoming Mathematicians" (MIT Press) is great.

Also, Prof. Murray has a website with even more info:

https://womenbecomingmathematicians.net/

(All in English.)

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks! I will read the web site and try to get the book! $\endgroup$ – Alberto Saracco Oct 25 at 15:58
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One such book is She Does Math!, by Marla Parker, published by the American Mathematical Society.

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Ciao Alberto,

I do not know if you ever came across "Remembering Sophia Kovalevskaja" which is a quite curious book written by Michele Audin. It is not "popular" in that the math discussions in the book are at a very high level and it is not "academic" in that the way in which it is written is more towards literary style. A very interesting reading in my opinion.

Also Teri Perl wrote a couple of books popularizing figures of women mathematicians, quite some years ago. A colleague of mine has a very good opinion on this: Math Equals , which I think is out of print now. But this is just a second hand comment.

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    $\begingroup$ Grazie Nicola. I will try to have a look at "Remembering Sophia Kovalevskaya", which seems nice, indeed! $\endgroup$ – Alberto Saracco Nov 7 at 12:52

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