Hot answers tagged

15

Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1949), pp. 33-34:A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.as quoted in:• M. López Corredoira and C. Castro Perelman, ...


13

"Did Rolle ever say/write any such thing (as that the calculus was 'a collection of ingenious fallacies')?" Michel Rolle (France, 1652-1719) certainly did attack the mathematical basis of the infinitesimal calculus. I haven't found the exact phrase attributed to him by the authors quoted in the question, but there are plenty of broadly similar attacking ...


10

This is all I have found for now: “You see, one thing is, I can live with doubt, and uncertainty, and not knowing. I think it’s much more interesting to live, not knowing, than to have answers which might be wrong.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1tKEvN3DF0 as discussed here: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Talk:Richard_Feynman#....


10

Yes, the quote is essentially authentic. This is from a typeset version "Récoltes et Semailles", specfically from "2.2 L’importance d’être seul." (To find the document online should be possible without much trouble, I do not link it here, as I am not aware of a stable location.) Par la suite, j’ai eu l’occasion, dans ce monde des mathématiciens qui m’...


9

According to a slide deck I found, it was Willis Lamb. Quote from said deck: In 1955, Willis Lamb started his Nobel Prize acceptance speech by saying that “maybe physicists discovering a new particle ought to be fined 10 000$”


8

The story is genuine. Isaacson retells it in his scientific biography Einstein: His Life and Universe based on recollections of his younger sister Maja, along with other evidence that dispels the early "Einstein was a slow starter and flanked school" story exaggerated by his parents: "His uncle Jakob Einstein, the engineer, introduced him to the joys of ...


7

Elementarmathematik vom höheren Standpunkte aus, Bd.2 Was eine Kurve ist, glaubt jeder Mensch zu wissen, bis er so viel Mathematik gelernt hat, daß ihn die unzähligen möglichen Abnormitäten verwirrt gemacht haben. see also Quotations by Felix Klein for the English version.


6

I have my doubts, although Feynman, like many others, expressed similar sentiments. Dennett in the first chapter of Breaking the Spell (2006) writes:"Philosophy is questions that may never be answered. Religion is answers that may never be questioned". He attributes the quote to Anonymous, and does not mention Feynman. It appears that the quote's author, ...


6

Fermilab director R. R. Wilson’s Congressional Testimony (April 17, 1969, p. 113): SENATOR PASTORE. Is there anything connected in the hopes of this accelerator that in any way involves the security of the country? DR. WILSON. No, sir; I do not believe so. (...) It only has to do with the respect with which we regard one another, the dignity of men, ...


6

You can find the quote (or something similar) in multiple places in the Théorie analytique de la chaleur, for example in Chapter I, paragraph (article) 14: "L'examen de cette condition fait connaître que l'on peut développer en séries convergentes, ou exprimer par des intégrales définies, les fonctions qui ne sont point assujéties à une loi constante, et ...


5

Since I have no shame, I screen-shotted the reference that J.G. found:


5

I am afraid there is no original source. Wikipedia has talk pages where sourcing is discussed, and its editors did extensive searches on this one and its variants. It is listed under the heading Unsourced and dubious/overly modern sources, and the "original" appears to have been made up by Ram Dass around 1970. Dass (born Richard Alpert) is an American ...


5

Nobody in particular, it is what is called collective image in literature. Feynman's attitude towards philosophy is expressed by another of his quotes, "philosophy of science is about as useful to scientists as ornithology is to birds", or "we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers… one saying to the other: you don’t know what you are ...


5

The wikiquote site gives the original quote from a letter of 4, April 1820: A parallelákat azon az útan ne próbáld: tudom én azt az utat is mind végig — megmértem azt a feneketlen éjszakát én, és az életemnek minden világossága, minden öröme kialudt benne... which it translates as Do not try the parallels in that way: I know that way all along. I ...


5

An annotated bibliography by Lagarias on the 3x+1 problem shows a couple mentions of papers by Erdős that touch on related topics, but seems to trace the quote as follows: Richard K. Guy (1983a) Don’t try to solve these problems!, Amer. Math. Monthly 90 (1983), 35–41. The article gives some brief history of work on the 3x + 1 problem. It ...


5

Citations in Wikipedia and in Schwartz's obituary (from which the quote is copied to many other places) refer to now defunct French site of Michel-Amadry, archived here. There the French quote is accompanied by "citation est extraite du livre "Le facteur temps ne sonne..." (quote is taken from the book "Time never rings...), which appears to be Le Facteur ...


5

This is a paraphrase of a common joke (in Germany, England and France). "Eat more fish. It is useful for your brain. Use your brain to make more money. Which will enable you to buy more fish". I suppose that it is of ancient Roman origin, as many common jokes, but cannot prove this.


5

Here it is in the original language « pourquoi faire des mathématiques ? ». La première médaille Fields française affirmait alors : « Parce que les mathématiques, ça sert à faire de la physique. La physique, ça sert à faire des frigidaires. Les frigidaires, ça sert à y mettre des langoustes, et les langoustes, ça sert aux mathématiciens, qui les mangent ...


5

From The Ultimate Quotable Einstein p. 170: If I were wrong, then one [author] would have been enough! Einstein’s retort with regard to his theory when he heard that a book titled 100 Authors against Einstein was published in Germany. Quoted in Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time (London: Bantam, 1988), 178


5

Ostrogradsky is well-known for his negative reaction to Lobachevsky's work, but in his signed reviews, at least, his complaints were different. Lobachevsky, in contrast to Ostrogradsky, was not a good expositor, and the paper he submitted to the Academy was obscurely written. Apparently, Ostrogradsky was only able to make sense of two integrals computed ...


5

Yes. The menstrual cycle is surely one of the "some of our functions" that Darwin speaks of in this passage: "The progenitors of man must have been aquatic in their habits. … In the lunar or weekly recurrent periods of some of our functions we apparently still retain traces of our primordial birthplace, a shore washed by the tides." Descent of Man, Chapter ...


4

This is an informal statement of the Weierstrass theorem: If $F$ is a polynomial in three variables, and $f$ solves $F(f(x+y),f(x),f(y))=0$, then $f$ is an elliptic function, possibly degenerate. Weierstrass did not publish it: apparently it comes from his lectures. Unfortunately, many of his lectures were not recorded, or no record survives. The first ...


4

This quote is taken from Poincaré's Science and Method, first pubished in 1908. The linked webpage from archive.org is an English language translation. The quote appears in section IV (titled Chance) of chapter I (titled The Scientist and Science). In the linked archive.org facsimile, the quote begins at the bottom of page 66 and continues onto the top of ...


4

The fourth quote is found in the posthumous work "Anecdotes, Observations and Characters, of Books and Men" Vol 1 (page 158), by the historian Joseph Spence (1820). They are reported to have been uttered by Newton just before his death (1727) to Chevalier Andrew Michael Ramsey (though the latter was recorded to be in France at the time). The second probably ...


3

90% it was a physicist from the late 19 or early 20th century Excellent memory! It is actually from Thomas Kuhn who was a physicist, and who later turned into a philosopher. His book The Structure of Scientific Revolution mentions something like this on page 152. This is the third edition 1962 reprinted in 1996. Edits: On page 151, he also quotes Planck.


3

Maybe a paraphrase of: David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), II.21, pages 37-38: all inferences from experience suppose, as their foundation, that the future will resemble the past, and that similar powers will be conjoined with similar sensible qualities. If there be any suspicion that the course of nature may change, and ...


3

Following the suggestion by @Guido Jorg I have found this article by Steven Weinberg published in The New York Review of Books on the May 10, 2012 issue. It's called The Crisis of Big Science and it contains the following quotes: Then in 1992 the House of Representatives canceled funding for the SSC. Funding was restored by a House–Senate conference ...


3

Dialogo sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo (1632), Day two: SAGR. Tali [facili da intendersi] sono tutte le cose vere, doppo che son trovete; ma il punto sta nel saperle trovare. [Stilmann Drake transl., p.225] So [easy to understand] are all truths, once they are discovered; the point is in being able to discover them. [ Th.Salusbury transl.,...


3

There is a second sentence to the quote:"The energy of the universe is constant. The entropy of the universe is increasing". The conservation of energy law. The second law of thermodynamics. The quote became famous because from the conjuction of the two conclusion about the heat death of the universe appears to follow. The idea was expressed earlier by ...


2

(What I'm trying to say is too long for a comment, but I'm not sure it's an answer...) Are you sure this is an exact quote? A fast research in Google books of the text or of part of it has provided no results. The concept expressed is very similar to the following, from On the Origin of Species, Chapter III: Struggle for existence, page 61: Owing to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible