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17

The following is how far we get from the direct English and German Wikipedia references. I had a look at the German Wikipedia reference wythagoras pointed out. In D. Nachmansohn, R. Schmidt: Die große Ära der Wissenschaft in Deutschland 1900–1933, 1988, Stuttgart : Wiss. Verl.-Ges., I could only find one reference regarding Hilbert, namely, the Hilbert ...


15

Yes, the quote is essentially authentic. This is from a typeset version "Récoltes et Semailles", specfically from "2.2 L’importance d’être seul." (To find the document online should be possible without much trouble, I do not link it here, as I am not aware of a stable location.) Par la suite, j’ai eu l’occasion, dans ce monde des mathématiciens qui m’...


15

Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1949), pp. 33-34:A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.as quoted in:• M. López Corredoira and C. Castro Perelman, ...


12

This is a scanned PDF of Evariste's work, that includes the memoir you're mentioning (parent page): See the left part of page #3: The only explanation I could find is here (French). Galois wrote this "Oh ! Chérubins" on the back of the cover sheet after the memoir had been (again) rejected. Presumably this is addressed to Mr. Lacroix and Mr. ...


12

"Did Rolle ever say/write any such thing (as that the calculus was 'a collection of ingenious fallacies')?" Michel Rolle (France, 1652-1719) certainly did attack the mathematical basis of the infinitesimal calculus. I haven't found the exact phrase attributed to him by the authors quoted in the question, but there are plenty of broadly similar attacking ...


12

The quote is from Lenin, in his instructions to Popov when discussing the project of organizing Soviet statistics in summer of 1918:"Statistics, as any other scientific discipline, poses problems and solves them in the interests of specific classes", see Kotz-Seneta, Lenin as a Statistician. Popov, an experienced statistician whom Lenin knew since ...


11

In my grandfather's book, lately translated from German: Recollections of a Jewish Mathematician in Germany, by Abraham A. Fraenkel, edited by Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, translated by Allison Brown. Hilbert’s response to a question of Bernhard Rust, the Nazi Reich Minister for Science, Education, and Popular Culture, was typical. At a banquet in 1934 in ...


11

I am afraid there is no original source. Wikipedia has talk pages where sourcing is discussed, and its editors did extensive searches on this one and its variants. It is listed under the heading Unsourced and dubious/overly modern sources, and the "original" appears to have been made up by Ram Dass around 1970. Dass (born Richard Alpert) is an ...


11

Almost. E P Wigner (1960), Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics 13 1–14 The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences THERE IS A story about two friends, who were classmates in high school, talking about their jobs. One of them became a statistician and was working on population trends. He showed a reprint to his former ...


10

This is all I have found for now: “You see, one thing is, I can live with doubt, and uncertainty, and not knowing. I think it’s much more interesting to live, not knowing, than to have answers which might be wrong.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1tKEvN3DF0 as discussed here: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Talk:Richard_Feynman#....


10

According to a slide deck I found, it was Willis Lamb. Quote from said deck: In 1955, Willis Lamb started his Nobel Prize acceptance speech by saying that “maybe physicists discovering a new particle ought to be fined 10 000$”


10

The story is genuine. Isaacson retells it in his scientific biography Einstein: His Life and Universe based on recollections of his younger sister Maja, along with other evidence that dispels the early "Einstein was a slow starter and flanked school" story exaggerated by his parents: "His uncle Jakob Einstein, the engineer, introduced him to the joys of ...


10

The quote is not accurate but Gauss actually wrote something similar to Schumacher in the letter of 1 November 1844 cited here, where he complains about concepts and definitions given in math books by philosopher that are not mathematicians, namely [...] look around at modern philosophers [...] don't their definitions make your hair stand on end? Read in ...


8

The closest match I could find is in H. Weyl, "Harmonics on homogeneous manifolds." Annals of Mathematics, Second Series, Vol. 35, No. 3, July 1934, pp. 486-499, as reproduced in K. Chandrasekharan (ed.), "Hermann Weyl: Gesammelte Abhandlungen Band III," Springer 1968. On page 389 of "Gesammelte Abhandlungen": A "finite&...


8

There is river imagery in a passage from the preface (written by Courant) to Courant-Hilbert's Methods of Mathematical Physics, vol. 1, but the point of the metaphor is somewhat different. It is excessive specialization rather than disconnect from applications that is seen as the danger, and it is drying out research rather then aimlessness that is feared: &...


7

An annotated bibliography by Lagarias on the 3x+1 problem shows a couple mentions of papers by Erdős that touch on related topics, but seems to trace the quote as follows: Richard K. Guy (1983a) Don’t try to solve these problems!, Amer. Math. Monthly 90 (1983), 35–41. The article gives some brief history of work on the 3x + 1 problem. It mentions at second ...


7

In responding to your question, I hope that I can convince you of the following two claims: Gödel held that the formal system of the actual Principia was that of ramified type thoery (simple type theory with orders built into the syntax). Gödel held that the formal system of Principia without orders built into the syntax would have been motivated by a kind ...


7

Elementarmathematik vom höheren Standpunkte aus, Bd.2 Was eine Kurve ist, glaubt jeder Mensch zu wissen, bis er so viel Mathematik gelernt hat, daß ihn die unzähligen möglichen Abnormitäten verwirrt gemacht haben. see also Quotations by Felix Klein for the English version.


7

You can find the quote (or something similar) in multiple places in the Théorie analytique de la chaleur, for example in Chapter I, paragraph (article) 14: "L'examen de cette condition fait connaître que l'on peut développer en séries convergentes, ou exprimer par des intégrales définies, les fonctions qui ne sont point assujéties à une loi constante, ...


6

I have my doubts, although Feynman, like many others, expressed similar sentiments. Dennett in the first chapter of Breaking the Spell (2006) writes:"Philosophy is questions that may never be answered. Religion is answers that may never be questioned". He attributes the quote to Anonymous, and does not mention Feynman. It appears that the quote's author, ...


6

Fermilab director R. R. Wilson’s Congressional Testimony (April 17, 1969, p. 113): SENATOR PASTORE. Is there anything connected in the hopes of this accelerator that in any way involves the security of the country? DR. WILSON. No, sir; I do not believe so. (...) It only has to do with the respect with which we regard one another, the dignity of men, our ...


6

Yes. The menstrual cycle is surely one of the "some of our functions" that Darwin speaks of in this passage from Chapter VI of The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex: The progenitors of man must have been aquatic in their habits. [...] In the lunar or weekly recurrent periods of some of our functions we apparently still retain traces ...


6

“Mathemata mathematicis scribuntur.” is the original Latin of Copernic which is easily translated as “Mathematics is written for mathematicians.” but Edward Rosen chose to translate this famous passage as “Astronomy is written for astronomers.” Obviously "astronomy" is not the author's word and also it is generally agreed that there was no ...


6

The common source of all modern quotes is probably Kline, Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (1972), or Terence Tao, Solving Mathematical Problems, a personal perspective (1992), anyway, it is a genuine quote from Proclus' Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's "Elements", last lines from the first part of the Prologue. ...


6

I quote from the book Physically Speaking A Dictionary of Quotations on Physics and Astronomy by Carl C Gaither. In the entry for Courant, there is discussion of rivulets drying up... Courant, Richard Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical problems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, ...


5

Since I have no shame, I screen-shotted the reference that J.G. found:


5

The wikiquote site gives the original quote from a letter of 4, April 1820: A parallelákat azon az útan ne próbáld: tudom én azt az utat is mind végig — megmértem azt a feneketlen éjszakát én, és az életemnek minden világossága, minden öröme kialudt benne... which it translates as Do not try the parallels in that way: I know that way all along. I ...


5

Nobody in particular, it is what is called collective image in literature. Feynman's attitude towards philosophy is expressed by another of his quotes, "philosophy of science is about as useful to scientists as ornithology is to birds", or "we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers… one saying to the other: you don’t know what you are ...


5

This quote is taken from Poincaré's Science and Method, first pubished in 1908. The linked webpage from archive.org is an English language translation. The quote appears in section IV (titled Chance) of chapter I (titled The Scientist and Science). In the linked archive.org facsimile, the quote begins at the bottom of page 66 and continues onto the top of ...


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