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1

So I think I know the answer to this, but haven't found any published confirmation yet. First, note that both coordinate systems relegate the vertical axis to the last coordinate (y in 2D, z in 3D); that this feels 'natural' is perhaps a result of Latin script being written horizontally. Now while this fully defines the 2D coordinate system, there are still ...


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I can recommend Colin C. Adams: "the knot book" for a very accessible introduction to knot theory. It covers some history of knot theory, esp. of knot tabulation, in the first few chapters, mentions many open problems that are at least easy to understand (I could even solve one of them, and I was a beginner), and contains many exercises. Like @Bee, I think ...


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I think you would be hard pressed to find one book that covers this whole period for all topics. For example, The Code Book (by Simon Singh) is a wonderfully written book which covers the history of the subject and ends with the the current problems in the topic which are being researched (i.e. quantum computing). If it's more the open problems part you ...


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The answer to your question in the title is definitely yes. For example, Fermat wrote in a letter: "Perhaps, posterity will thank me for having shown that the ancients did not know everything". Fermat lived a century after Tartaglia, and the general opinion was still that "the ancients knew everything". This opinion began to change only after the invention ...


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Feynman is being... liberally creative. What he says is his own interpolation that "makes sense" from the perch of today. "Must have been psychologically wonderful", perhaps, but "freeing of man from the intimidation of the ancients" is not how the men of Renaissance generally felt. The intimidation they sought the freeing from was not of the ancients, but ...


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For a history of decimal fractions see Smith's History Of Mathematics, vol II, pp. 238ff. In the Middle East, Smith gives credit to al-Kashi (c.1400), but the relevant algorithms, in a table notation, appear already in al-Samawal (c.1150), see Katz's History of Mathematics, 7.2.3. Notationally, the fractional separator was initially a bar placed over the ...


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It is not random. These names are of Greek origin, and -ic or -ics are Anglicizations of the Greek suffix -ikos, which meant "pertaining to". In other languages it can be rendered as -ika or -ica, Wolfram's "Mathematica" uses such a version. From the Online Etymology Dictionary: "-ics in the names of sciences or disciplines (acoustics, aerobics, ...


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There are two theories which are called "relativity". Special relativity. It required no advanced mathematics at all. Minkovski space, as a proper mathematical background was proposed after the theory itself. General relativity. Mathematical background is Riemannian geometry. Riemannian geometry was proposed by Riemann, as a very general outline in his ...


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